Your Brand Marketing

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees Need

 

Employees are one of the pillars that keep our business growing; without them, our business will cease to exist. So what do employees need to keep them in your company? In this episode, our guests, Erica Parisi, a Senior Consultant in HRIS Transformations, and Imtiaz Khan, a computer engineer, identify what employees need to be loyal and engaged at work. Money may be essential for us but money alone is not enough to keep employees at work; employees also seek opportunity to grow. Erica and Imtiaz also share what kind of leaders they want to work with and how they like to communicate with them. This episode has in store so much more insights from Imtiaz Khan and Erica Parisi, so tune in now and learn more from The YourLivingBrand.Live Show!

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LBL David Crysler | Root Cause

 

What do Employees Need to be Loyal and Engaged at Work?

With Imtiaz Khan and Erica Parisi

[00:01:14] I love the fact that you come back every single week, month and year. We have been doing this for many years. I appreciate every single one of you that share this and your comment. You email me at Ben@YourBrandMarketing.com and find me on LinkedIn @YourBrandMarketing. We sit there and talk about what’s going on, what you like and what you don’t like, what you are thinking about and what you are interested in. I love that. Thank you for being an amazing audience.

In this episode, we’re going to take a different take. Most weeks we talk to industry experts about ideas about what’s going on in business but over the last little while, we’ve been talking about communication. I want to bring in people that are in the workforce. People that are on the team. People that are doing things, the Millennials and the Gen Zs. Have them come on and talk about onboarding, quiet quitting, engagement, loyalty, trust and all these different issues that we’ve been thinking about.

Also, be able to make sure that we understand from their point of view, what they need to be successful because nobody wants to quit a job every eighteen months. Nobody’s out there wanting to have their resume in their hands all the time. We need to find out how we can work together to make this more successful. Let me bring on board Imtiaz Khan and Erica Parisi. Welcome to the show, you two.

[00:02:38] Thank you.

[00:02:39] Thanks, Ben. Thanks for having us.

[00:02:41] I’m excited to have both of you. What I wanted to find out is both of you work. Germain St-Denis was on my show several months ago and he worked with you both at Ceridian. You’re both not with Ceridian anymore so we can mention that as a point of reference. I wanted to find out from both of you. When you left there and were looking for a new position, what were the things that you were thinking about?

You sit there and say, “I’ve had a good job. I was making money. It was time for whatever reason to move forward.” What were the thoughts going through your mind saying, “When I move forward and look for my next position, these are the things I want to have and need to have?” Erica, why don’t you start with that and let’s get this conversation started?

[00:03:30] My experience with leaving Ceridian was a bit different. I wasn’t actively looking. I had an opportunity that came to me but to be sold on the opportunity, I was searching for certain criteria. I was looking for stability while I was at Ceridian. In 1 year and 15 months that I was there, I had 4 different managers. It gets a bit tough trying to build a relationship with every new manager every three months. You’re trying to move up in a company, get on new opportunities, try to learn and grow and every three months, there is a new person whom you have to build a relationship with.

The stability for me wasn’t there. I was looking for an opportunity. What kind of new company can give to me that Ceridian couldn’t give to me? Ultimately, it was a whole new ball game in the consulting world, whereas Ceridian is very technical. Where I moved on to was it became more of a mix of functional and technical. It was a whole new world of consulting. It was the opportunity and the stability that was offered to me.

[00:04:28] Imtiaz, why don’t you give your thoughts and then we’re going to take it from there.

[00:04:32] For me, it was more about the community. I had a very close friend who worked for Ceridian and he switched to a different company because he had gotten a better offer and opportunity there. That was the first reason he reached out to me. He was like, “There’s an opportunity. Do you want to switch your job?” I was like, “Yeah, why not? Let’s give it a shot.” It was a big company as well. The other big reason was the salary was pretty big. It was a good switch for me as well. Me living in this generation, the cost of living is high. The monetary increase is very important as well. That was one of the big reasons why I switched.

[00:05:10] Let’s get that out of the way of money and opportunity. Money is important to us, especially when we’re younger and we have none. We were all at one stage of our life where we were sitting there going, “Money is important because it buys the things that we need to have.” You’re married, Imtiaz and you have a kid on the way. You have diapers, formula, education and all that kind of stuff to pay for and I get that but is it the money or is it what the money and the opportunity provide you? When you say opportunity, what does that mean to you? How do you measure opportunity?

[00:05:45] When I was working at Ceridian, it was more about learning about their software. I wasn’t learning anything which was transferable knowledge. Being able to have that platform where you can grow and learn something and you’re not just tied to one company was a big opportunity for me. That’s how I see opportunity as. The other thing is with Ceridian, I had a great mentor and community but at the same time, as the company was growing, it was losing the touch that we required.

Most people were leaving because of the workload. We also need a lot of flexibility. We need to be trusted. When we are working for a company, if you keep asking me why this is not done, rather if you give me that opportunity to know my situation, it’s important. It’s because we live in a generation where we have to deal with a lot of things all at the same time. It was important for me to have that transition where I can be valued. I don’t have to be answering every question. It’s a great company but I feel like it wasn’t trusting my work as much as it should have.

Employees need a lot of flexibility. They need to be trusted when they’re working for a company. Click To Tweet

[00:06:53] Erica, why don’t you answer that same question? I then want to get onto expectations and accountability because that is at the heart of what Imtiaz was talking about.

[00:07:03] If I can piggyback off of what Imtiaz was saying, in terms of the non-transferable skills, I agree with that one. We were strictly learning Dayforce. There was some functional consulting involved but it was mostly about getting the system out. Whereas when you move on to a consulting company, you’re learning how to consult with a client and get them where they need to go.

It might not be their current state but it should be their future state, whereas that’s not what we were learning. It was whatever their current state is should be their future state and get it out there. When you combine that with the systems that we’ve learned, to get us to a very good spot in our careers and for the future, that’s what I was looking for.

[00:07:51] From what I’m hearing from both of you that is it’s not only learning a skill. It’s learning transferable skills and skills that will allow you to piggyback and learn other skills. It’s that constant growth and ability to learn, challenge yourself and do different things instead of being, “This is what you do. This is what you’re going to continue to do.” There might be a revision of the software but all you’re going to do is be able to learn different versions of the same thing. Is that a good way to put it, both of you?

[00:08:23] Yes. If I can add one more thing to what Imtiaz said where he was mentioning the why wasn’t this done type of thing. I agree with him on that. If you’re hiring employees, you should trust them to get the work done without having to always be on top of them and asking them why isn’t it done. To be honest, where I’m at is I’ll get the question but the follow-up question will be, “How can I help you get it done,” which is what we appreciate in our generation. Everyone’s very aware that it’s a heavy field. There’s a lot to do and learn. Acknowledge that we are younger in this field and we might not have all the answers so offering the, “How can I help you get it done,” I appreciate that. That’s very important to me and I’m sure Imtiaz agrees.

If you’re hiring employees, you should trust them to get the work done without constantly being on top of them and asking them why it isn't done. Click To Tweet

[00:09:04] That’s an interesting point because I agree with that. The role of a leader is to remove the issues of the people that they’re leading, make them champions and help them succeed. What are the things that you are looking for in your next leader? Knowing where you are and where you’re going, what are the things that if you were going to sit there and say, “That’s the person that I want to have as my next leader,” what are the skillsets that person would have that would make you want to follow them and work for them harder? Imtiaz?

[00:09:38] One thing is vision. Leaders should have a vision as to where they want us to go or at least, guide us through that. I’m a big fan of Elon Musk because he has a vision. He knows what he wants. That puts us in a position how to decide what will work and what won’t work. The other thing is to have trust. This is something very similar to what I’ve said before. Sometimes what happens with the new structure that we have, the customer is the most important thing and that’s what all the companies tell us

When we are serving customers, the companies need to understand that not all the time the customers are right. Sometimes we have to work and deal with difficult customers. Sometimes they have different emotions and that can delay our work and be a barrier to how we can succeed. If our managers are coming to us and going like, “Do you have a deadline for a week,” and it’s not done yet, instead of asking that question, they should be asking, “What went wrong? How can I help you? How can I escalate it?”

Sometimes we don’t have all the resources. We don’t know who to reach out to in situations like that. Have a leader who listens to us, asks the right questions and also gives us a vision as to what is expected. We get tasks on a project but those are small manute tasks and we are not sure about the whole picture. If they can give us a vision, “This is a client who needs this solution,” we get the bigger picture. We understand what the common goal is and we can work. Maybe the way they ask us to complete a task is not important. It can be done a better way and then we can contribute by giving more suggestions, much better optimized and better solutions. It’s important to be in that loop where we understand the whole picture rather than getting small tasks to work on.

[00:11:28] Erica?

[00:11:29] To be honest, where I am currently working, the leaders in my team are pretty great but what maybe I like to see a bit more of is empathy and maybe a bit more work on the work-life balance. It can be very hard especially being a woman. I’m not trying to discredit anything. We have the stuff to take care of. We got to cook and clean. Sometimes the days can be very long and I feel like sometimes there’s no empathy there. That’s something that can be worked on but aside from that, everything that Imtiaz mentioned, I do see it in my leaders now. They’re very, “How do I help you get to where you have to be?”

We’re not micromanaged. We’re like, “We trust you to do your work,” unless it’s not done then we’ll be micromanaged but aside from that, they trust us to get our work done. We have counselors. We don’t have managers. Our counselors are there to essentially help us to get to where we want to get. If I were to go to my counselor and say, “I want to be a project manager in the future. I no longer want to be a technical consultant,” she’s going to work to get me on a project that will help me grow my project management skills to get me to where I want to go in my career. In terms of future leaders, my leaders are pretty great at the moment.

[00:12:42] However, a little bit more empathy might not be a horrible thing. Let’s talk about communication styles because that can always be a challenge. We all speak and listen differently. What are the things that you find are the most effective communication styles for you? Everybody communicates better and people listen differently. How do you like to be communicated with? What do you find is the most effective way, Erica?

[00:13:08] Feedback is key whether it’s positive or constructive feedback. I often find myself asking for feedback. It reinforces that either I’m doing a good job or I’m not. When I know someone is comfortable giving me feedback, I build that trust with them so I’m able to have certain conversations with them. That might be a little bit harder if I don’t know how they’re going to take it or how they think, process or judge. They are not necessarily judging in a bad way. They judge a situation in general. If I don’t have trust in someone, it’ll be harder for me to have certain conversations. I feel like feedback and trust essentially are very critical in my conversation style personally.

[00:13:49] It’s more of an informal communication in terms of feedback at the moment. It’s not waiting for a monthly review, quarterly review or yearly review. It’s, “Erica, we have a problem. We need to deal with this. Let’s sit down, talk about it and figure out how we’re going to do it together.” Is that more of a type of situation you’re looking for?

[00:14:06] It would depend on whom I’m talking to. If it’s my project manager, he’s a very hands-on type of project manager and super great on the project. I’m on a longer-term project so I’ll be on it for a while. I’ve built that relationship with him because I’m going to be working with him for a very long time. Essentially, the conversations are informal and if I need to voice something, I’ll call him. I’ll be like, “I don’t agree with this and this.” We’ve built that trust and relationship so he’ll be very receptive. He’ll turn around and be like, “What do you need? How can I make it better? Whom do we need to talk to that made you feel a certain way?” It always comes down to trust, to be honest.

[00:14:50] To be able to have those conversations at the moment and not letting things stew, build and get misinterpreted probably has a lot to do with that as well. Imtiaz, I have the same question for you.

[00:15:01] I also agree with Erica. It’s more about the feedback and being formal because we are in a workforce where everything is getting a bit more informal. I like the way our managers reach out to me on the spot with the current situation, rather than wait for six months when I forget about the whole project. Having feedback or communication at the right time is important. If it’s informal, that way it’s easier. The other thing is if it’s feedback, it needs to be personal instead of being very open about it in large email communication. If the managers are able to come to us in person and have a quick conversation that doesn’t make us feel uncomfortable is important.

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees Need
What Do Employees Need: Having feedback or communication at the right time is important.

 

[00:16:13] That’s what I want to get into. How do you like to be communicated with? There are Teams, Slack and chatbots. There are all sorts of different technology at our fingertips. If there’s a problem and an issue that needs to be dealt with, how do you want to be communicated with? Do you want a phone picked up? Do you want an email saying, “Can you come into my office?” What’s the best way for people to have those conversations that should be intimate that are one-on-one and should not be done in front of a group in such a way that you feel that it’s both immediate and also has that personal touch to it?

[00:16:46] I feel like any kind of feedback, if it’s related to our performance or an incident that happened, it’s better if it’s in person or at least over the phone rather than being on an email or a chat because sometimes you don’t understand the tone. You don’t get the message when it’s a written communication but if it’s face-to-face, you see their tone and it makes a big difference.

If it’s hard communication like it needs to be done from the manager to us letting us know about our performance, it’s better if it’s in person or at least a phone conversation. A video conference would be much better than a phone conversation but a written email sometimes makes us uncomfortable because we are not sure how to respond to it and explain the whole situation in a response. The in-person conversation is much better.

[00:17:41] Erica?

[00:17:42] I would have to agree with certain points that Imtiaz said. It depends on the conversation we’re having. If it is a feedback conversation, even if it’s a conversation with the partner of my firm, I won’t necessarily talk to the partner of my firm the way I talk to someone I talk to every day. It’s not the same relationship and the same level of conversation that we have. That’ll be a bit more formal and that’s generally done through an email.

If there is something that needs to be said to me quickly, I would say Teams is probably the best for me. I grew up with a phone in my hand so I always have my phone with my Teams there. It’s like a text message and I’m very into texting. It’s my age group. That’s the quickest way and depending on whether is it a quick resolution, is it not a quick resolution? If it is, then it’ll be done. If not, then I’ll generally escalate. Let’s have a quick call. It’ll be way simpler and quicker to have a quick call on it but generally, the first means of communication I would say is Teams.

[00:18:37] We all love our own technology. I’m a big believer in 2 texts, 1 out and 1 back. If it isn’t resolved, I pick up a phone. It makes my life so much easier.

[00:18:46] We’re in that age group where we’re getting certain phone calls and if we don’t know who it is, we don’t answer. I’m like, “Who’s calling me?” People don’t usually call me. If I do see a phone call, I’m like, “Who’s this? I’m not going to answer. Leave a message or text me.” It’s Teams. Send me a message on Teams and then if we need a call, at least I know who’s calling me.

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees Need
What Do Employees Need: We’re in that age group where when getting certain phone calls, if we don’t know who it is, we don’t answer.

 

[00:19:08] When we’re dealing with expectations and accountability, it’s up to leaders and team members together to have those conversations and say, “What method of conversation works for the both of us?” It’s got to be something that is going to be mutually convenient, comfortable for both people and doesn’t make the other person feel uncomfortable, ignored or miscommunicated. We need to work together to be able to do all that. I want to get into quiet quitting because it’s the big word now. Everybody is sitting there going, “Quiet quitting.” People are banging their chests and saying, “Yep. I quietly quit. I’ve been doing it for five years.”

It’s just another word for disengagement or doing your job and only doing your job. “I’m paid for 40 hours. At 40 hours in 1 minute, I’m out the door. I’m only paid to make 40 phone calls a day. I’m not making 41.” How prevalent is this amongst your age group? How many people admit to it? How often are you seeing this within the workforce of people working to rule versus sitting there and going, “Yeah, but this is my job.” Imtiaz?

[00:20:20] I can’t speak for all my generation but I can talk about myself, especially with the company that I’m working in. It’s never been a 9:00 to 5:00 job. It’s never been you have to sign in at 9:00 and log out by 5:00. It’s more like, “These are the tasks that you have at hand. Make sure you get them done by the deadline.” If need be, I have been working up until 9:00 PM on some days and there are days where maybe I worked 2 to 3 hours and was done with it.

The flexibility that this company provides is helpful for me as well because they’re not asking for accountability. “You have to sign in at 9:00 even if you don’t have a meeting.” Maybe I have a meeting at 1:00 in the afternoon but I don’t have to wake up early to be in the office and do nothing at all. It’s never been like I’m waiting for 40 hours to be completed and I’m checking out. I’m given 60 hours if need be and that’s how I work. That’s been helpful for the company as well.

[00:21:22] Erica?

[00:21:23] I would have to agree. Imtiaz and I are in the same field. I can’t ever say, “I did my eight hours and I’m going to log off for the day. I have a million other things to do for go-live.” I’ve never done that and I can’t say I work with anyone who’s done that either. Do I know some people who will be while I did my 40 hours? Yes. It also depends on the type of job like the career path you choose. Some jobs you can do and some jobs you don’t. In the consulting world, I’ve heard many people say, “A consulting job is never 40 hours. It’s always a little bit more.”

It is true. I do think it’s important that companies recognize that. They allow you to be flexible. You touched on that point in your previous comment where you were saying setting expectations with your leaders on calls and stuff like that. When I was added to this current project that I was mentioning, the project manager on this project reached out to me to introduce me to the project. In terms of setting expectations, he was super open in the sense that he asked me, “Are you a morning person or an evening person?”

Companies must recognize and allow you to be flexible. Click To Tweet

You don’t expect me to be awake at 8:30 AM because I’m a night person. I like to sleep in the morning. I appreciated that so much. I was like, “In some prior jobs that I’ve been at, if I start at 8:00 and I was there at 8:02, I would get a warning.” Whereas here it’s, “I can adapt to you if you’re more of a later night working person. We’ll work until 6:00 to 7:00 but we won’t work at 6:00 AM.” I appreciate that adaptability. Some of the work-life balance plays into that but the flexibility that comes with that is great.

[00:22:57] It’s the ability to sit there and say, “These are the projects that we need to get done. This is why we need to get it done. It needs to be done by this time. How you get it done is up to you?” Is that what you appreciate?

[00:23:12] Yes, exactly.

[00:23:14] Let’s move on from there to one of my favorite questions. Work from home, work from the office or hybrid. What’s best for you and why? Imtiaz?

[00:23:28] Ever since I joined the workforce, it’s been online for me. I’ve been working from home but if you gave me the option, the hybrid would be a good option for me. What I have realized throughout my career is the lack of seeing your colleagues makes it difficult to work. Sometimes you don’t feel engaged. It’s if I do have the option to go into the office and work, see my colleagues who are working on the same project and have a quick conversation, which is something tough over phone calls or Teams because we haven’t seen anybody face to face. Team building is important for us to meet in person.

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees Need
What Do Employees Need: The lack of seeing your colleague makes it challenging to work. Sometimes you don’t feel engaged.

 

With that being said, it doesn’t have to be a mandatory thing. It should be more than once a month or once a week. If you are able to, we can team up with all the members that we want to meet or work on a project. If we have that flexibility, it’s much better rather than the company telling us, “You have to come every Monday or Saturday,” rather than if we are given that flexibility where we can communicate with our team members and tell them. “Let’s meet up on Thursday evening and work on this problem that we have been struggling with for a while to get together.” That flexibility of working in a hybrid situation would be much better for me.

[00:24:51] Erica?

[00:24:52] I realized my answers are very similar to Imtiaz’s. It’s the same thing for me. I started Ceridian on the first day of the pandemic on March 16th, 2020. Prior to that, I worked in recruitment and finance. It was the furthest thing from consulting. I’ve always done this job remotely. Do I like going to the office and seeing my colleagues? One hundred percent. At times, I can be a very social butterfly. At another time, however, I’d like to be home alone in my cocoon not being bothered by anyone.

With hybrid, however, I would lie saying I’m having an easy time adapting. I’m not because I’ve never done this kind of job in an office. It’s not always the shortest day. It could be long days. We could have meetings from 8:00 to 6:00. I don’t live close to the office at all. If I factor in travel time, my day becomes fifteen hours. I do enjoy hybrid because that people interaction I find very important, to get out of the house a little bit and not be looking at the same four walls all the time.

In general, for your social skills and social development, it’s important to see other humans once in a while. In this type of job, I would have to say hybrid but not very often in the office. I prefer remote. To Imtiaz’s point, I do agree that you’re putting these big projects in our hands and trusting us to get stuff done.

It's important to see other humans once in a while. Click To Tweet

You should trust us to make our decision or let us decide when we want to go in and when is the best time for us to go in, rather than giving us a mandate or a quota like, “You need to be in every single Monday or come into the office a minimum of 3 to 4 days a week.” If you’re trusting us to get the work done on projects, you should also trust us to make our schedules and know to go into the office when we can.

[00:26:46] It’s interesting when you say that because Apple created a mandate. It’ll be interesting to see what happens with this because they’re getting some pushback and some people all over the news are saying how horrific this is. What they’ve said is everybody in the office on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For teams, you can decide one day a week that is for your team and you can make that decision as a team. It can be Monday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday. They don’t care. It could be Saturday for all they care.

You as a team decide what works for you. My question is why is that so horrible? If it is horrible, what could be done better to make that work for everybody? I do understand that there’s a commute. However, you are also having to deal with the needs of the greater organization and not just the needs of the individual. They’ve got to be weighed off against each other.

[00:27:39] For me something about it is not progressive. It wasn’t like, “Let’s progressively start coming in one time a week for 1 month and then we can move on to 2 weeks.” It’s right away off the bat three days a week starting next week. The last few years have been very hard and any sudden change in our lives at this point is very hard to adapt to. As humans, we should adapt to change but there’s been a lot of hardships over the last few years. A lot of us have adopted in terms of, “I don’t have any kids yet,” but are my kids going to daycare? Do I still have to pay for daycare since I’m home?

Maybe I can get rid of that expense. If I have to go back to the office three days a week, that’s an additional expense I have to consider. Before I may have used to order takeout a lot because I didn’t have time to cook dinner but during the pandemic, I had time to cook dinner every single night because I was home. I’m going to have to resort to takeout again, which can also be an expense. People have adapted to life at home. It’s a sudden change to have to go back to the office three days a week.

[00:28:41] It’s not the fact that it is being implemented. It’s the speed at which it’s being implemented.

[00:28:46] It’s not progressive at all. It needs to be implemented in a certain way that we’re getting used to it and we’re working on it. We’re trying to figure out our lives and how we’re going to adapt and that’s not how it’s happening.

[00:28:57] Imtiaz?

[00:28:57] For me, it’s more to do with the reason. What’s the reason that they want to mandate it? Is it important for me to be going to the office, working at the same closed doors and not meeting anyone? Does that benefit anyone? Is it like, “We have some functions and training. Are we going in for a reason?” If there is a reason, I don’t mind going every Saturday, every Tuesday and Wednesday but it has to be important for me to be present.

We have all these all-hand calls and we are all quiet. We don’t contribute in any way. We’re not even paying attention. Maybe we’re multitasking or emailing our clients. If we are going on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, we are doing our thing and we are not getting any benefit out of it, I don’t see why we should agree to it.

To be honest, if I ask you that you have to travel from Toronto to Mississauga by walking, even though you have trains, buses and other ways to do it faster, would you do it? Maybe not. Why should I commute to the office when I can get my work done from my home via good internet? Everything is changing like the workforce. It’s important for us to figure out what benefit would it be if everybody is forced to come into the workforce.

[00:30:14] What’s the purpose? Why are we coming into the office? How does it benefit not only me but how does it make everybody’s life better? It’s not just coming into the office so you could be on Teams meeting with somebody on floor number 3 when you’re on floor number 5. I get that. A couple of quick questions and then I’m going to let you go. One question that comes to mind and this is the one that I want to end on is, what would make you leave a company? What is the one thing that you would sit there and say, “That’s it. I’ve had enough of that. That doesn’t fly with me. I got to go?” Erica?

[00:30:50] For me, it would be the moment I don’t feel I’m gaining anything like any knowledge or I’m not being challenged anymore. I’m someone I need to constantly be busy and feel like I’m being challenged. I’m learning and my brain is stimulated. I’ve been in positions where I have been incredibly bored and it’s not fun. That would be a factor in it. Another factor is the work-life balance. Eventually, I would like to have some children so the work-life balance for me is incredibly important. I can’t do 65 or 70-hour weeks if I have a baby at home. It’s not going to be feasible. For me, those are the two major components.

[00:31:31] Imtiaz?

[00:31:32] For me, the first would be trust. We have been speaking about it for a while. My managers and everybody around me, if they trust my work and the fact that I’ll get the thing done, that is the first thing. If by any chance I feel I’m not being trusted or I’m being questioned at every point on our stage, it would be a big red flag for me. The second would be work-life balance. We say it a lot in our companies. We mentioned everybody is concerned but when they are giving us work or task, a lot of the times they don’t ask us, “Is it feasible? How long will it take us to complete?”

They’re only giving us a task that generally takes 4 weeks and we will get it done in 4 weeks but are we prepared to complete it in 4 weeks? Do we have the bandwidth? These are some questions they should be asking. If they’re not, what happens is they end up giving us a lot of work and we burn ourselves trying to meet the deadlines and their needs. In the long run, it’s never a happy situation for us. I’m like, “This needs to stop. I’m not gaining anything out of this. I need to have a healthy family life as well.”

[00:32:51] Here’s the question I’m going to ask you because this is one I ask everybody as they walk out the door. As you leave a meeting and you get in your car and drive away, what’s the one thing you want people to think about you when you’re not in the room? Imtiaz?

[00:33:08] One thing that I want all the people or clients to think about me is that they can reach out to me. I’m accessible. I’m only a phone call away or a text away. That’s one thing I want my clients, my friends or anybody to feel when I connect with them or I meet them.

[00:33:28] Erica?

[00:33:29] For me, I aspire to be one of those people that you’ll leave a meeting and be like, “I want to be like her one day.” I want to be a role model for people. I want people to say, “She has the ability to get stuff done.” That’s important. In life, I want to be able to help people and lead them. If there’s one takeaway, I’d want people to have about me it would be that.

[00:33:51] The two of you have given us some great things to think about. It’s been enlightening. I love the answers. People need to read this again a couple of times and take notes because there’s some real gold here. I want to thank you both for your thoughts and your passion and for doing what you do. Thank you very much for being on the show.

[00:34:10] Thanks for having us. It’s been a pleasure.

LBL David Crysler | Root Cause

Important Links

 

About Erica Parisi

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees NeedErica Parisi is a Senior Consultant in HRIS transformations, primarily leading the Core HR and Workforce Management modules.

Erica’s primary system of expertise is Ceridian Dayforce, where she began her consulting career and has excelled in the implementation of this software and most recently has been working with UKG Dimensions.

She is a driven and dynamic professional with a background in solution consulting, recruitment administration and finance. Additionally, Erica is a member of the Chartered Professionals in Human Resources.

 

About Imtiaz Khan

LBL Erica Parisi | What Do Employees Need Imtiaz Ahmed Khan is a computer engineer and completed his master’s degree from the University of Waterloo, Canada. He was born and raised in Dhaka,Bangladesh and moved to Canada in 2018.

He is currently working as a Technical Consultant for a leading software company that provides EHSQ (Environment, Health, Safety, and Quality) solutions for large enterprises. His expertise is in legacy data migrations, web services, and automation.

He also has industry experience in Workforce Management Systems and Building Management Systems. Imtiaz actively participates in social activities and was the ex-president of IEEE NSU Student Branch and member of the executive body at Social Services Club in Bangladesh.”

 

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Silver - one episode plan $4395.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Four 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Four 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable pecple to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social meda.
  • Six images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Five or Six tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • An edited transcript of the interview that enable you to ganer even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • One 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing that looks like this

GOLD - four episode plan $10998.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do t, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Three additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social mead and email campaigns regularly,
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 3060 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media
  • Twenty-four (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis
  • Twenty four (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Four (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Four 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this

PLATINUM- twelve episode plan $27750.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine.
  • Eleven additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Twelve (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Twelve 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this.

The SILVER option is designed for companies on a limited budget or who would like to try the power of the Communicate Your Why program before committing.

It provides you with a reasonable amount of shareable content and access to our network. However, for most companies, this may not provide a full year's worth of marketing materials. If you purchase a SILVER package and decide to upgrade within 30 days of the airing of your episode, we will credit 90% of the SILVER package towards either a GOLD or PLATINUM package.

Our expectation is that we will release your episode within 30 days of the recording date.

The GOLD option is a basic yearly marketing package.

Optimally, you would release an episode quarterly and use the content that accompanies it to update your marketing on a quarterly basis. It is literally four times the amount of marketing materials as the SILVER option and allows you to not only tell your story but create a case studies with clients or talk about specific ways you add value to your clientele in a non-sales way. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and a more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes quarterly.

The PLATINUM option is designed as a monthly marketing package

It gives you the content you desire to stay top of mind with your clients and prospects, talk about ongoing developments and tell a more robust story. Again, if you purchase a GOLD package and decide to upgrade to a PLATINUM one within 90 days of starting the original GOLD package, we will credit 90% of the original purchase price towards the price of the PLATINUM option. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes monthly.