Your Brand Marketing

LBL Bryan | Presentation Skills

 

How do effective presentation skills help you craft sales pitches that resonate well with your audience? Bryan Flanagan talks about this in this episode. Bryan’s career journey him understand the corporate marketplace and what it takes to achieve success despite today’s competitive environment. He founded the Flanagan Training Group, which offers training programs for teams and individuals to increase and improve their productivity to produce growth. In this episode, he dives deep into techniques and strategies on presentation skills and sales approaches.

Listen to the podcast here

LBL Annissa Deshpande | Modern HR

 

The Nexus Between Sales And Presentation Skills: How To Resonate With Your Audience With Bryan Flanagan

[00:00:58] The fact that you tune in every single week, you share, you comment, you email me at Ben@YourBrandMarketing.com and let me know what you think, I love you and I appreciate you all. I am bringing on somebody that is a great extension OF some conversations we have already had. We had Fred Kienle and Tom Ziglar on the show. Now we are going to have Bryan Flanagan. He worked with Zig Ziglar for 25 or 30 years. As we said, you never leave. It’s like the mafia. Bryan, welcome to the show and let’s get into the nexus between sales and presentation skills. I’m all in on this. It’s going to be a great conversation.

[00:01:41] There’s a lot of connect to there. Especially as it’s shifted over the last couple of years, you would better be good in both. You better increase your game and bring you’re A-game and both because now our chances are getting a little slim for contacting and people presenting.

[00:01:58] We are going to get into all that, but give people a little bit of history. You started off with the heydays of IBM, got into the trading business, and moved over. You spent twenty-plus years side-by-side with Zig Ziglar. As I said, it’s the mafia. You are never going to leave it. Give people a little bit of a hint about where you came from and where you are now, and then we’ll start talking about the nexus between sales and presentation.

[00:02:22] Like a lot of people in your audience, I’m an accidental settled person. I thought I wanted to be a high school basketball coach. As I was raised the same way you were. Whether it’s Canada or Louisiana, our moms told us the same thing. She said, “Don’t talk to strangers. Don’t ask people for money,” so I go into sales.

For some, it’s counterintuitive. It’s done on that delay. As I say to people, during my second senior year at the university, I got a job as a delivery boy for IBM. I worked hard. I put forth the effort. I knew how to work. My dad gave me a great work ethic. At the end of that year, I barely graduated, but they liked my work ethic and they hired me in the office products division. If you grew up with Xerox, you know that we were pedaling office equipment, office supplies, and copiers. I was doing typewriters and dictation equipment. I got lucky. I wasn’t a very good salesperson because the process didn’t take. IBM was great. I love IBM. They treated me well, but the process they would teach, I didn’t have a lot of confidence. I got lucky and I was promoted to the National Training Center as a sales instructor who couldn’t sell.

[00:03:28] To those who can’t sell, teach. Was there a thought process at that time?

[00:03:32] I have added a Woody Allen line. Those who can do, those who can’t teach, and those who can’t teach, teachable. I got the one main place in Downtown Dallas, and one of my buddies saw that I was struggling. He said, “You need some confidence.” I was a little guy from a little town with a little image and I was competing with people from New York, Seattle, and Boston, so I needed help.

My buddy said, “Go out and buy a book by a guy named Zig Ziglar.” I never heard of the man before. I went down through the Downtown bookstore in Dallas for $12.95. I bought a book entitled See You At The Top. At that time, I wasn’t a bookworm, tapeworm, or wasn’t in the listening program, but I got to page 48 and one sentence changed my life.

Zig told me and it was written just for me, “You cannot consistently perform in a manner that’s inconsistent with the way you see yourself.” My mother told me after 30 years, my wife had told me that for 8 years we have been married, but until I read that book, I was missing success by about 12 inches. That’s a distance from my head to my heart.

You need to invest more in yourself than you do in your career. Click To Tweet

Zig Ziglar said, “Bryan, you’ve got the intellectual side. You need to deserve love. Follow my principal. Get involved. I will help you increase that.” Two years later, I go to San Francisco, California for the largest branch of the office products division as their sales manager. The change was more in Bryan than in the salesperson. I learned a valuable lesson. I learned you need to invest more in yourself than you do in your career.

The reason I say that is Jim Rohn says, “Personal growth proceeds professional growth.” That has been a difference in my life, and Zig was a catalyst and still is. I was low enough. I was begging for a job for several years. He hired me. I wrote some presentation skills towards his form. We took it into Corporate America. I wrote sales programs through ticketing Corporate America. At that time, Zig was doing mainly on personal growth and motivation in front of large audiences. He wasn’t doing a lot of sales training. That’s when the corporate training division of Ziglar was launched, and I was a part of that for many years.

[00:05:37] It’s fascinating because I’m a big believer in a personal brand. As I keep telling people, people have a brand whether you know it or not. It’s how are you perceived by others when you are not in the room? You can’t project who you want to be unless you know who it is you are yourself until you understand who you are, what you are, the good, the bad, the ugly.

This is me warts and all. This is where I come from and what I do. I’m an embrace it. These are the things I do and I don’t do well. I’m going to embrace it. When we can do all that, live with ourselves, and be able to give ourselves that proverbial hug, we can go out there and we can do incredible things for others, but if we don’t, we can’t. That’s always been my philosophy.

[00:06:25] Zig told me, “It’s hard to give something away you don’t have. If you do over a period of time can be found out, that’s not a career builder.” He tells people a lot. I can’t do this. One of the greatest parts about being around Zig was that he was the most consistent man I have ever met. He would tell people, “I want to do what you do. Don’t quit your day job. Build some credibility. Become consistent.”

He would say that and that’s what happened. The dream that was born in 1952, when his wife bought him tickets to go to be a motivational speaker, he wasn’t realized that’s in 1968, he went into full-time. He saw that build up and he paid his dues. That’s why I probably think that more so than anybody I have run into, he’s the most consistent professional I have ever met.

[00:07:10] That’s a challenge for a lot of people when it comes to sales. We are dealing with a generation of people, and I’m not talking Gen Z or Millennials. Even Gen X-ers that seen the world become faster, and sit there and go, “I want everything immediately. I can see success at others. I want that for myself, and I want it now. I want that big screen TV, flashy car, boat, house, yacht, or whatever it is,” and they don’t understand that for people to have reached that level of success, all they see is the veneer and where they are now.

They don’t see the 30 years of hard work that it took to get to that person’s level of success. The real challenge is, and I’m going to ask your advice on this, is how do we help people understand that true, real, and lifelong success takes time, consistency, perseverance, and it takes a lot of falling on your face and cleaning up that bloody nose and getting up again. How do you help people? This is a real challenge for a lot of people. They expect that success comes now and it doesn’t.

[00:08:26] There was a level of expectations in life and then there’s a level of reality. If you don’t manage those two, it causes burnout and frustration like, “I’m not good at this.” A lot of things happen emotionally if managing the impatience that people get caught up in. The other thing is, “Where’s the evidence?” I’m a big evidence guy. Where is the evidence that you should have this success based on where you are? Where’s the evidence that you should get this from or that you deserved this?

LBL Bryan | Presentation Skills
Presentation Skills: You cannot consistently perform in a manner that’s inconsistent with the way you see yourself.

 

If there’s no evidence, then perhaps you are misplaced and your level of expectation is unrealistic. You need to move it down a little bit. What are you doing now is to prepare you tomorrow? What are you investing in yourself that allows you to be in a position to be asked, “Come talk to me, we have an opening at another territory or another unit. Let’s do the interview?”

There’s an expectation level because everything is so high up, quick, and we want to watch 60 minutes and half an hour kind of thing. We can back in the day, we can get TiVo and cut out the commercials, all those things. What hasn’t changed is success comes in a series of things much as you said. It’s a destination that you are going for but on the journey to get there, you’ve got to hit those benchmarks along with the way.

[00:09:40] Do you think that sales culture is a detriment to a lot of salespeople’s success? Here’s what by that. You have sales teams that are being measured on daily, weekly, monthly, and quarterly sales. What have you done now? You are behind or your head. Here’s your quota, push. It’s that continual push based on the fact that they are not paid very well and it’s all commission-based, you are sitting there going, “I have to sell, push myself, and succeed or else I’m going to starve to death.”

Are there a lot of challenges with the way that compensation packages, cultures, and the sales leadership runs the sales organizations that put salespeople in a position where they do not present or help people at their best because they are more worried about making the sale than they are worried about making a customer?

[00:10:36] I’m curious. Do you know a Canadian company that has a strong sales culture? Does anybody come to mind?

[00:10:44] I honestly don’t. I know things have a reasonable culture, but not anybody that I would sit there and say, “Here’s the great sales culture that I would put up out there.”

[00:10:53] You know great salespeople within a company have a great culture. If you were in Xerox, whatever year you were at Xerox, they believed in training and development at IBM. We had sales calls and I run into a lot of companies that were planning a training group. I’m running into a lot of companies that are being run by anything, but sale focuses.

They are being run by manufacturing or funding. I understand some of that. The sales culture is a necessary evil. I was on YouTube and saw Geoff Burch talking about, “Here’s a Dodo bird and he is big.” Even though he’s in front of 200 people with a PowerPoint behind him, he drew a Dodo bird on a flip chart, “Right around here, you put a little of this, and that’s his wing.”

The reason the Dodo bird can’t get off the ground is that everybody captured them. It was no longer a Dodo bird that he wasn’t equipped with. This is what he said, “In England, wings are the sales department and they can’t get you off the ground.” I thought, “I wish I would have said that. That could be a Bryan Flanagan original.” What happens is that we give a lot of lip service and there’s not great sales leadership in the organization.

Success comes in a series of things. It’s a destination you are going for and it’s important that you understand the journey to get there. Click To Tweet

The other thing is one man’s belief that we had these kids come into the selling and they are selling a lot of software, technology, and platform. All is good and well and is needed. Yet, when they get into a sales position, they make the assumption that the buyer knows as much as they do to a certain degree. If I present my technology and a little twist, whistles, and bells that we do differently, you miss the buyer that has enough intelligence to relate it to a personal benefit or a business benefit to you. That’s when I see young and new salespeople in that field. They are not selling the value. They are selling the functionality and they hope you have enough intelligence to interpret it into a benefit, value, or advantage.

[00:12:57] The dangerous thing is that we assume. There’s something called the internet. That’s been around for years. We assume that our buyers are more intelligent than we are, they are out there doing all this research, all this thing, and be able to do this. They absolutely are. What’s missing is they don’t understand it.

They understand that, “This thing fits in this space, it cost about this amount of money. It does this,” but they don’t understand how does this make my business better and how does this make my people more efficient?” That’s where we get into sales and presentation skills to be able to sit there and say, “How do we communicate in the language of our customers and show them how this has enabled them to succeed?” I want to hear your thoughts on this.

[00:13:52] When you are on your website, Ben Baker doing a little research on you. In your website bio, you said that you are a curious person. That’s one of the things we belong. ABC does not stand for Always Be Closing. It stands for Always Be Curious.

[00:14:05] Glengarry Glen Ross brought it up to 2022.

[00:14:09] Alec Baldwin misled some of those guys, but you want to close but at the same time, I don’t know how to close. They will have enough information to point you in the direction on my presentations that will benefit you. I learned about whoever has the most information has the most influence.

I didn’t learn that in my 20s, 30s, 40s, or 50s. I’m late to the party on that, but how do you get that information? You need a process, and one of the things that I struggled with early in my sales career is that selling is a process. It’s not a personality. That was my problem. I got two sentences that I use. Just because you’ve had the ability to carry your tune, does not mean you have the ability to sing. Just because you have the ability to talk does not mean you had the ability to sell. When you talk about selling and converging with presentations, I see it all the time in tangible and intangible presentations. We are making product presentation. We are not making selling presentation.

You need a process to get to the point, how much of this product? How much of this presentation do I show you that would benefit and allow you to see the values of the advantages of benefits. As opposed to whether it be making general right turns at a car dealership on the comfort drafts, but we have not interpreted that. That’s a Law Of Start. You said early in our conversation that the camaraderie of salespeople is the law. You still have paper and pencil order forms. It’s sorted out.

We would come in at 4:00 or 4:30 and give it to branch office administration. We would sit around the office until the watch store. They don’t do that anymore because everybody is working remotely and wants to get out at 4:59. I think that the younger settled people miss a wealth of mentorship, but not hearing war stories. The customer says, “Can you believe he wanted the account to this?” When I was a rookie, I was taking notes of what the senior sales guy did. They were two years away from retirement. I would start it.

LBL Bryan | Presentation SkillsLBL Bryan | Presentation Skills
Presentation Skills: Selling is a process. It’s not a personality.

 

[00:16:40] I remember when I first started in sales and I had these senior old sales guys that were probably mid-60s. As you said, a couple of years away from retirement. I couldn’t get enough of them, their stories, sitting around these people, and being able to sit there and say, “How would you handle this situation?” They then would have another story. What’s missing in terms of the camaraderie is enabling the elder generation to sit there and say, “This is how we did it.” I understand technology has changed, but human beings have not.

Technology and process may be different, but human beings are still human beings. They want to be listened to, understood, and valued. If we can get to the point where we can build those sales presentation and teach people how to present effectively, not in their mind, but in the mind of the customer, we are going to be far more effective, and that takes training.

As you said, “Just because you can speak doesn’t mean you can sell.” How do we turn around and get to the point where we get back to that and can get to a sales team that can get out there, sell, be valuable, and valued by their clients and not be saying, “Here comes another person trying to sell me of something?”

[00:18:09] That’s the stigma and what happens is that you and I both ran into nonprofessional salespeople early in our lives and retail salespeople knock on your door. The modern days, the telemarketer has been telling you. I’m a big believer that the process takes the pressure off the person. If you have to go out, make a call, pick up the phone, leave an email, voicemail, or LinkedIn, or you have to reprocess on putting benefits ahead of your purpose then you stand a better chance of being affected to making more calls. Activity drives accomplishment.

If every time I send an email, LinkedIn, a voice, text, or whatever it is, I have got to make something up and I don’t have a process to fall back on, then it’s frustrating. I’m not going to make as many calls. To have a track to run on, there has to be a process that absorbs the pressure, not the buyer or the seller. That’s the key and my clients find value in that.

[00:19:09] It’s guard rails. It’s not every single call is going to go the same way. It’s not, “My name is Ben. I’m calling you from this company. Can I speak to the CEO?” No. Every call can be different. Every person or human being that you are dealing with is different, but if you have guard rails and say, “I need to make sure we talk about this.” I know that we need to make sure that these are the things that we know. These types of people, the hot buttons that they have, and be able to at least qualify them to build some trust and say, “This salesperson knows a little bit about my business.”

[00:19:46] That’s available. You said that the buyer now has access to websites and product knowledge. In the olden days, we brought that product knowledge to our clients. That’s no longer the case. There are two types of questions, high impact and high gain. These questions are so important. High gain means I’m asking you a question and I gained a lot of information. High impact is that I have to request it. I impressed the buyer that I have done my research. He’s saying, “That kid knows what he’s doing. He made a great point.” That impact is the impression or esteem the buyer holds you in with those types of questions.

[00:20:25] That’s both sales and presentation. Before we go any further, how do you define the difference between sales and presentation? We have glossed over this. We have talked high level about this, but how do you define the difference, and then we can get back into that point?

[00:20:38] To me, selling is identifying what the person needs to move forward and the presentation is showing them the path to get there.

Whoever has the most information has the most influence. Click To Tweet

[00:20:47] That’s your curiosity factor.

[00:20:50] That’s the gathering of information. Your curiosity and your mind, and the sales rep awareness. As he’s talking to you, as he is given this information, your mind is going, “I can click. There’s a connection there.” The second connect has to do with the other person’s mind. You’ve got to confirm that the customer is interested and has a need in his mind. She has to show you some indicators like, “The status quo. I may be able to do that better,” and that’s called buyer or customer awareness.

I use two light bulbs. You have to have a light bulb. The customer has the light bulb. If not, if I have the information and you haven’t confirmed the needs, I’m going to offer you a glass of water and you don’t know you are thirsty. I’m making a presentation to you because I don’t know enough to be able to do that.

[00:21:39] Also, being able to qualify. They may have the need and the hurt but do they have the money to be able to afford your solution?

[00:21:47] That’s part of the awareness. Are they the decision-maker? Is there a sense of urgency? Is there a recognized need? Do they have the ability to pay? Those things you’ve got to filter through by some types of questioning skills.

[00:21:59] I find that people are so focused on themselves and their products. I call it the twelve-sliced toaster. I invented this twelve-sliced toaster. It’s the most incredible thing in the world. My mother and everybody around me who’s friends of mine think it’s the most incredible thing in the world. Everybody is going to want this and they are going to want it for the same reason as I am. That’s not exactly true.

[00:22:26] Let me answer the question to your audience and I can’t see you out there or pretend I can. By a show of hands, how many of you have a passion for what you do? Most people will raise their hand. Second question, when you explain your passion, how many notice that not everybody has the same degree of passion that you have?

What I try to do is teach my classes how to put your counter ahead of your patch. I get a hold of Zig in 1970 and I’m at the National Training Center in Downtown Dallas. I live 26 miles away. I’m driving and I’m listening to cassette tapes. I get to the break room at 7:30 or 7:45 before work. I go in there and  go, “I heard of distributional resilience.” Zig tells a great story and I see people peeling off. They are going back to their office. I’m overbearing. And overselling. I’m pastored about what Zig has done for me. I’m not talented enough to know how to communicate. That’s what happens to salespeople when they get ahead of themselves. They lead with products as opposed to lead these needs.

[00:23:27] How do we help salespeople? Salespeople, as you say, a lot of the time step on their own feet.

LBL Bryan | Presentation Skills
So, You’re New to Sales

[00:23:36] I believe that within the process, no matter what process you use, you’ve got to come up with what do you say when you have to say it. It’s not necessarily rope, but you need enough arrows in your quiver at a networking event to have something to say. When you meet somebody and they say, “I have got a couple of minutes. Come on now on a drop buy or cold call if we call them.” You’ve got to have something to say.

If you can frame the call, let them know, “I want to find out your goal. I put a circle here. I put a line.” If the prospect is like, “I can’t go reach goals towards but I do better than anybody. Once I find out your goal, then there’s a line coming out of the circle. I have tried to put you in the best vehicle to reach those goals. If I can do that, I expect to earn your business. Can we talk about what you are trying to achieve in this area? I can smooth with them all I want, but the primary factor is what are you trying to achieve and am I the guy?”

[00:24:28] It’s getting them to know that you are not on the opposite side of the table for them. You are on the same side of the table. You are there to help them solve their problem, and that’s where a lot of people miss the boat. A lot of salespeople are out there to sell a product and a service. They are not there to solve a problem. The key thing, whether it be in the sales or the presentation, is to be able to sit there and say, “When I’m presenting, getting information, or being curious, what is the pain point? What’s making this person tear their hair out. What’s making this person lose money? If you’ll have staff running out the door or whatever it is, do I have a solution that can fix that?”

[00:25:11] I asked the business owner, “At the end of the day, how do you know you’ve been successful?” He’d got sixteen sales reps throughout the nation. He thought about it for a second. I know when I am successful at day, how long does it takes me to fall asleep? My vehicle to his goal, I want you to have better sleep. I want you to have more sleep and less sleepless nights. I want you to hit the pillow and be asleep quick. Also, I sell sales training. I do presentation skills, but it’s not what I do. It’s what I do for them, and there is where the value lies. It’s a personal vent. The greatest I have ever had when I asked them my favorite questions.

I said, “If we can help your sixteen salespeople be more successful, what’s it benefits you?” “It benefits me if I will be able to put 70 years of cash away from my little girl and will never be self-sufficient.” He had the other disabled child. He wants to protect her. The older daughter, he wanted to protect her. That was with him. That was his goal and he builds it up. He gets these guys good and he sells it to make sure his two daughters are taken care of. I would never have gotten that answer had I not asked that question.

[00:26:24] As a salesperson, that puts you in the 1% because all of a sudden, you are sitting there not selling something that is $1, $5, or $10. You are selling something that solves a problem they have. It’s something that gives them peace of mind, and as you said, it enables them to sleep better at night. When you can do that, the price and the cost factor go away. Whether you are $10 or more expensive or $20 less expensive, it’s irrelevant if you are the person that understands them and helps them solve their problem.

[00:26:56] That’s a differentiator right there. If you want a separate, lead with me. Don’t lead with the product or service where you’ve been in this for many years. Lead with their needs. One of the biggest mistakes I see still is I’m going to make a presentation. I’m on the shortlist and they got two guys either in front of me or behind me.

I’m going to grab their PowerPoint and the first six slides are about my company. You got to the shortlist. They know about your company. Tell them about your company, but not the first six slides. Put that in an addendum. Give them something to take home, but I want to know if you identified, this is the benefit of this, this is how we get this, and then talk about your company if you felt about it at all.

[00:27:33] We talked about this. The Mad Men carousel of presentation. It’s one of these things that you can’t explain. You have to watch it. For people reading, go look up Mad Men YouTube and it’s called The Carousel. It’s something you will love and want to watch over and over again.

Just because you have the ability to talk does not mean you had the ability to sell. Click To Tweet

[00:27:58] It is a full minute of professional selling. The customer wanted to call it The Wheel and Draper went the other way. Here’s the key for everybody. Relationships, selling, and managing are leading families. People make new decisions only when given new information. That’s ideal of his giving them new information.

[00:28:22] What you did is you tied it back to their emotions. When you can do that, it’s a powerful thing. I want to be careful of your time, and I have got two questions that I’m going to ask you, and then I’m going to let you go. The first one is probably a little bit longer, but we’ll try to keep it succinct. What do you see is the big difference in sales and sales presentation between 2019 and 2022? We have gone through COVID. We have done things. We have far more remote people. It’s harder to get ahold of people at the office itself. What’s the one piece of advice you give salespeople that’s going to help them be able to reach the right people in the right way given the new reality?

[00:29:05] Number one, with sales skills you developed in 2019 still apply in 2020, 2021, and 2022. Focusing on other people. Being in their zone, not your zone. Leading with need, not leading with products and chains. Secondly, you better get comfortable and effective in front of a screen. That’s where it’s moved. In my business, it lightened up a lot. It was here in the states. I don’t do international. Although, I did go to the Oklahoma region.

[00:29:33] That’s a whole other universe if we’ll go that way.

[00:29:36] You have to have a passport. You need to be effective in front of the screen. That means you don’t have to have a green screen. Watch all of them, but if you still have to have selling skills and presentation skills, you’ve got to clean up uhs and ums. All of those things are distracting. The eye contact all over the place. It looks like you are unsure of yourself or it looks like you are deceiving. Those are the things that are fundamental, but the biggest change is you’ve got to be a remote salesperson a lot of times, but you’ve got to be able to do that and do it effectively.

[00:30:11] Here’s a small little thing. What I do is I take my screen and I minimize it down to about 1/3 or 1/4 of the actual screen size. I take the image of the person that I’m speaking to and I put it literally right underneath my camera. When I’m looking at them, I’m looking at the camera at the same time. It looks like I’m looking at somebody in the face.

That’s a skill that is a small little thing, but it enables you to be able to have somebody think that you are looking at them in the face while you are looking at the camera at the same time. That’s what it is. It’s being able to make that eye contact. The best way for people to get in touch with you is FlanaganTraining.com. Is that the best way?

[00:31:02] Yes. Email is Bryan@FlanaganTraining.com.

[00:31:09] Here’s the last question and it’s one I ask everybody as I send them out the door. When you leave a meeting, a sales training, or get off the stage and you get in your car and drive away, what’s the one thing you want people to think about you when you are not in the room?

LBL Bryan | Presentation Skills
Presentation Skills: Selling is identifying what the person needs to move forward and the presentation is showing them the path to get there.

 

[00:31:26] That I teach them to do good. Not feel good.

[00:31:29] That’s so simple but so powerful.

[00:31:34] I won’t say feel good but I want to be able to do good.

[00:31:36] We all need to do better. I don’t care who we are or what we do. We can all be better. There are sales, communication, and reading, our lifetime achievement awards. Nobody perfects it. All we can do is aspire to be better.

[00:31:53] You never graduate from selling with all presentation skills.

[00:31:56] Bryan, thank you for your time. Thank you for your wisdom and I appreciate it.

[00:32:01] Thank you, Ben.

LBL Annissa Deshpande | Modern HR

 

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About Bryan Flanagan

LBL Bryan | Presentation SkillsBryan Flanagan began his career as a delivery boy for the IBM Corporation in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He then invested the next 14 years with IBM as a salesman, a “people” manager, and a sales instructor at IBM’s national training center.

Bryan then joined the Zig Ziglar Corporation. He served as the Director of Corporate Training for Zig for over 25 years working with a variety of companies, industries, and clients.

In 2005, Bryan founded Flanagan Training Group. In this capacity, he designs and delivers training programs which improve team and individual productivity and growth. He has authored numerous training programs including his sales book “Now, Go Sell Somebody Something.” His latest book and CD set is entitled “So, You’re New to Sales.”

One of his most requested training programs is “Effective Business Presentation Skills.” This is an intensive workshop where each of the 11 Essential Skills are defined, demonstrated, and then practiced! Each participant is actually recorded during several short presentations, and receives feedback immediately following the practice session.

He is a proud graduate of Louisiana State University with a B.S. in General Studies. He and Cyndi have been married for 52 years; have two children, and resident in Plano, Texas.

Bryan understands the corporate marketplace and what it takes to achieve success in today’s competitive environment.

Bryan Flanagan
www.flanagantraining.com
bryan@flanagantraining.com
214-505-5109

 

 

 

 

Silver - one episode plan $4395.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Four 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Four 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable pecple to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social meda.
  • Six images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Five or Six tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • An edited transcript of the interview that enable you to ganer even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • One 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing that looks like this

GOLD - four episode plan $10998.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do t, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Three additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social mead and email campaigns regularly,
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 3060 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media
  • Twenty-four (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis
  • Twenty four (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Four (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Four 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this

PLATINUM- twelve episode plan $27750.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine.
  • Eleven additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Twelve (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Twelve 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this.

The SILVER option is designed for companies on a limited budget or who would like to try the power of the Communicate Your Why program before committing.

It provides you with a reasonable amount of shareable content and access to our network. However, for most companies, this may not provide a full year's worth of marketing materials. If you purchase a SILVER package and decide to upgrade within 30 days of the airing of your episode, we will credit 90% of the SILVER package towards either a GOLD or PLATINUM package.

Our expectation is that we will release your episode within 30 days of the recording date.

The GOLD option is a basic yearly marketing package.

Optimally, you would release an episode quarterly and use the content that accompanies it to update your marketing on a quarterly basis. It is literally four times the amount of marketing materials as the SILVER option and allows you to not only tell your story but create a case studies with clients or talk about specific ways you add value to your clientele in a non-sales way. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and a more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes quarterly.

The PLATINUM option is designed as a monthly marketing package

It gives you the content you desire to stay top of mind with your clients and prospects, talk about ongoing developments and tell a more robust story. Again, if you purchase a GOLD package and decide to upgrade to a PLATINUM one within 90 days of starting the original GOLD package, we will credit 90% of the original purchase price towards the price of the PLATINUM option. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes monthly.

Welcome to the communicate your why podcast network
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Welcome to the communicate your why podcast network




By submitting this form, you agree to receive on-going communications from Your Brand Marketing. You can always unsubscribe.

Subscribe to the email below and never miss an episode