Your Brand Marketing

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting

 

Podcasting has come a long way. There was a time when people didn’t even know what it was or how to access it. There was a very limited supply of equipment, and whatever was available was very expensive. And in this crowded space, it’s easy to get lost in the noise, causing podcasters to just give up and turn in that mic. But hard work will always pay off. Take it from the man who runs the world’s largest oil and gas podcast network, with over 2.6 million listeners from 198 different countries. Sought-after public speaker and author Mark LaCour shares insights into what it takes to create a great podcast and the influence and responsibility that comes along with it. He talks about the value of building a relationship with your followers and an engaged audience over the number of downloads you get for every episode. If you have a great message to put out and are considering building a podcast or someone who has already put content out there but is hesitant, or worse, discouraged by the turnout, tune in and learn how the slow burn accelerates as you consistently put in the effort to create binge-worthy content. Don’t give up just yet. Listen and find out what the future of podcasting is looking like.

Listen to the podcast here

 

LBL Bryce | Red Team Thinking

 

The Future Of Podcasting With Mark LaCour

[00:01:10] Welcome back, my wonderful audience. Thank you very much for reading. I love the fact that you email me at Ben@YourBrandMarketing.com, ping me on LinkedIn and tell me what you like. We had about 1,700 people part of the conversation going back and forth and having some great conversations. I love the fact that you have those conversations and tell me what’s going on.

We’re going to get back into the nitty-gritty of podcasting. I’ve got Mark LaCour. He has got a company called OGGN, which is the Oil and Gas Global Network. They run podcasts strictly for the oil and gas industry. We’re talking about niche upon niche. I wanted to have Mark on the show. We’re going to sit down and talk about where podcasting has been, where we are now and where we’re going. Mark, welcome to the show.

[00:02:10] Thanks for bringing me on, Ben. I have to give you a big shout-out. I love the fact that your audience engages with you that much. It’s one of my favorite things about podcasts. In that medium, you get so much engagement. People feel like they know you because they have listened to you for years. I’ve got some funny stories about that but hats off to you for doing such a great job in your show that people are reaching back out and wanting to engage.

[00:02:30] It’s my favorite thing. You sit there and talk into the mic. You hope you’re doing a good job, you’re interesting, you’re adding value and you’re speaking to an audience and somebody sits and goes, “That’s something I needed.” People reach back and say, “That helped me. I passed your podcast on to my boss. He loved it. I shared it with a couple of clients. They loved it.” It brings my heart joy when I hear that because it’s all about adding value and saying, “This is the audience. These are who these people are. They care about this stuff.” If I can give a little bit of a nugget and give somebody an a-ha moment, my life is a little bit better. I love doing this show.

[00:03:19] There’s this level of intimacy that you get with podcasts in your audience that doesn’t work on any other medium like videos, print or TikTok. People feel like they know you and they’re on this journey with you even though the podcast is almost like education through storytelling. To have this group of people that want to be a part of it is fantastic. I feel the same way.

[00:03:42] It doesn’t matter whether you have 500, 50,000 or 500,000 loyal fans. They’re loyal fans. They deserve our utmost respect and honor. There’s the fact that they listen every week, share, talk and all that stuff. I love them all.

Your number one goal is to generate enough revenue so you can hire an editor and get that task off of your plate because you can only do that amount of work for so long. Click To Tweet

[00:04:02] One of the misconceptions about podcasts is that the value is the size of your audience. That’s not true at all. We have multiple shows. Some of our smallest audiences are the most engaged ones. Some of our largest audiences are the least engaged. Don’t always put a value on the number of downloads or listeners that you have because it doesn’t line up that way.

[00:04:19] I want to talk about that. We will get into that. Everybody is sitting there going, “I’ve got 50,000 or 100,000 downloads.” I’m like, “How engaged are these people? Is this moving the needle for you? Is this helping you achieve what you want to achieve? Is this making either your brand or your company’s brand more valuable? Are people going to your website? Are people knowing, liking and trusting you?” That’s important but before we start, why don’t you give people the 50,000-foot view of who Mark is? What brought you into this podcast arena? We will then get into the subject.

[00:05:04] I’ve been in the oil and gas industry for many years. Years ago, my employer kept my commission. It pissed me off. I started my first company, which is still around, modalpoint, out of anger. In the process of growing that company, my marketing guy came to me and said, “We should start a podcast.” I looked at him and said, “That’s the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard come out of your mouth. Nobody listens to those things.”

Years ago, there was no app to download it. You have to download MP3 files. The software used to edit was expensive and clunky. Most people didn’t have broadband. We couldn’t do what we’re doing, which is a remote interview. It was on a decline. The name podcast comes from Apple’s actual iPod, which was an MP3 player. At first, our podcast had a lot of success and then got flooded with bad content. It started sinking.

We launched our first show. He kept on like a little kid and wore me down. Eventually, I said okay so he would shut up and leave me alone. What I didn’t know is we started the first oil and gas podcast in the world. Three months into it, Red Wing Boots calls me and goes, “We want to sponsor your podcast.” I almost said, “Why?” The old sales guy in me kicked in and said, “Shut up and let them talk.” That’s the beginning of this empire that I’m sitting on. That’s how I got started. I thought it was a stupid idea.

[00:06:21] I’ve been podcasting for years. It started by accident. People said, “You need a podcast.” I’m like, “Why?” Years ago, there were far more bad podcasts out there than there were good ones. There wasn’t a community. The technology was expensive. I can buy a $150 mic in 2022 and sound great with $500 or $1,000 back then or more. There wasn’t remote software. You couldn’t do half the things that we’re doing in 2022. It was a different world. It’s like trying to go to the moon in 1969 versus 2022.

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting
Future Of Podcasting: A misconception about podcasts is that the value is the size of your audience. That’s not true at all. Some of the smallest audiences are the ones that are most engaged, and the largest audiences are the least engaged.

 

It’s a different experience. We need to realize that this whole game has changed and is changing. From day one to the first couple of years, what were the things that you saw that made you scratch your head and say, “Maybe this is something that is going to add value. People are recognizing it, seeing value in this and connecting with us because of this?” What was the a-ha moment besides somebody reaching out and throwing money at you? There has to be more than that.

[00:07:36] The money thing was important. The fact that it happened early on is also important. What happened was we signed contracts, which meant that we had to release episodes. If any of your audience is starting a podcast early on, it gets easier the more you do it. I don’t remember what the statistic is. Most podcasts end after about seven episodes. We couldn’t quit because we were under contract. It made us get better and more efficient.

I tell my podcast hosts, “It’s usually around episode 20 or 25.” You finally settle down and ignore the fact that you have a microphone in your face. You’re not worried if you press record. You get to listen and have a conversation with a fellow human being. That’s when it gets easy and becomes valuable to you. We were very lucky that we got a sponsor early, which made us get through those first 25 episodes.

The bigger a-ha moment was I was in an airport in Mexico City. I was changing planes and talking to my girlfriend. Somebody recognized my voice, ran up and hugged me. They go, “Mark, I love your show.” Here’s a strange woman in a strange country coming up and hugging me but she listened to me for a couple of years. She felt like she knew me. She had that level of intimacy. She was happy to meet me in person. That was like, “Can a podcast do that and have that much power across country borders?” It can. It does.

[00:08:59] That’s an amazing thing. I’ve been to podcast conferences. People have recognized me. In an airport in a foreign country, you have somebody sit there going, “I know that voice. Where do I know that voice from?” They realize that voice has been in your ear for two and a half years. You’ve built a relationship with this person because, in two and a half years, you’re invested in the podcast and the knowledge. You’re expecting that episode every single week. I want to dive into what you said. It’s that commitment because that’s what’s missing in a lot of people’s podcasts. They don’t realize how much work it is to be able to be committed to putting out a podcast every week. I want you to talk about that for a bit.

[00:09:47] In the beginning, especially if you’re small but work a lot, recording the episode is not that much work. It’s the editing, promotion and social media. What happens is you get better and start hearing mistakes you normally wouldn’t hear that are in the audio. You spend even more time editing. It gets to be a mess. I tell a lot of beginning podcasters, “Your number one goal is to generate enough revenue so you can hire an editor and get that work off of your plate because you can only do that amount of work for so long.”

The value is the engagement with your audience, not the size of your audience. Click To Tweet

The other important thing is when you’re thinking about growing your podcast. Everybody is worried about downloads and the number of listeners. Instead of thinking about it that way, think about how much can you cause them to do something, whether doing something is to go to a web page, download an eBook or leave a review. That thing is the real power in growing your audience.

The more people that you can have that are engaged and active even if it’s a small number is way better than having a large audience that’s not actively engaged. I’ll give you a perfect example. One of our smaller shows has about 30,000 to 40,000 downloads. That audience is so loyal. It’s our health, safety and environmental audience. Ben, is your show explicit or not?

[00:10:57] Go for it.

[00:11:05] I could get on the microphone, go to that audience and say, “I need you to go to Pornhub and give me your Social Security card number and driver’s license number.” They trust us so much. They would do it. We would never do that. My largest audience is oil and gas, which is 1.7 million downloads by itself. I can’t give away free t-shirts on that show. I’m showing you the value is the engagement with your audience, not the size of your audience.

[00:11:32] That’s so important for people to tell. I do a lot of consulting on podcasts for people starting podcasts. The first thing I tell people is, “Ignore your statistics and analytics for six months. Don’t even look at them because you will go crazy.” Your mom, your girlfriend, your boyfriend, a couple of your friends and if you’re lucky, 1 or 2 coworkers might listen to the show.

You’re starting with 8 people that might listen to your 1st episode. It’s going to take months to build an audience. That’s okay. You need to be able to be okay with that. It’s a slow burn. Building a podcast and a loyal audience is a slow burn because all of a sudden, I tell two friends, they tell two friends and so on. The podcast grows but it only grows when you build that loyal audience from day one.

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting
Future Of Podcasting: There’s a lot of really bad content out there. In some ways, it’s good if you produce good content because then you stand out. On the other hand, it’s bad because people have to wade through so much bad content to find you.

 

[00:12:29] There’s another side of that too, which I’ve seen over and over again. You’re right that it grows slowly and organically. 2020 in some ways was great for podcasts. In other ways, it was horrible. During the pandemic, the whole world either became YouTubers or podcasters. I couldn’t buy microphones in 2020. My microphone company had its best year in its 100-year history in 2020.

What happened is there was a lot of bad content out there. In some ways, it’s good in the fact that if you produce good content and stand out but in some ways, it’s bad because people have to wade through so much bad content to hope to find you. If you stick to it and you grow, at some point, instead of that growth being linear, it becomes exponential. I can’t tell you why and when but I’ve seen it.

We have fifteen separate podcasts. I’ve seen it with every single one of them. The numbers go slow typically for about two years or so and then it starts going straight up because your host has gotten good at what they’re doing and at storytelling. You’ve built enough audience that they recommend it to friends. It’s hard to buy an audience with podcasts. It has to be organic growth. When you have 500 people talking about how good your podcast is, that grows your audience way quicker than when you have 5. I’m telling your audience to stick with it. Somewhere right around that two-year mark, you can see that growth go straight up.

[00:13:47] Think about it. At the two-year point, you probably have somewhere around 100 episodes. All of a sudden, you have this substantial catalog that is way bigger than 90% of the podcasts out there. I don’t know if it’s under 7 episodes or 10 episodes. 80% to 90% of most podcasts out there fail in under 10 episodes because people aren’t willing to put in the time, work and effort but if all of a sudden, you’ve got 100 episodes, people start crawling your past episodes. They go, “I like this. Maybe I like this.” They start going back and listening to the catalog.

[00:14:23] They binge-listen.

[00:14:25] It’s like Netflix for the ears. Not everybody is going to identify with every single one of your episodes but all of a sudden, people will sit there, listen to an episode and say, “Johnny will like this. Susan will like this. Alice will like this.” They will send them different episodes to binge on. All of a sudden, if those people like it, they will start looking at your newest episodes.

During the pandemic, the whole world either became YouTubers or podcasters. Click To Tweet

That’s when the system works. It takes time and effort. It’s about a two-year slow burn. I can say that for myself. First of all, I was a way better podcaster with 100 episodes under my belt than I was with 0. God help anybody who goes back and listens to the first ten episodes of my show. Go do it. I’m embarrassed. They’re still up there because they were a good learning lesson for me.

They enabled me to get better. It’s like working out in a gym. You will never lift 300 pounds the 1st day you go to the gym but if you lift a little bit more every day, push yourself and strive a little bit more to get a little bit better daily, those shows can be incredible in 25, 50 or 100 episodes, depending on how much you’re willing to dedicate to it.

Let’s talk about podcasts in 2022 because we have gone through the COVID era. The COVID era had two and a half million podcasts if I remember correctly. Somebody fact-check me. We’re doing this on air. I don’t have Google up while I’m talking. Somewhere around 2.5 million podcasts got created during the 2 years of COVID. A lot of it got sent to a saturation point.

How do we help the podcasts that are willing to put the time and effort in to differentiate themselves? We went from having 500,000 podcasts, 1 million podcasts, to 4.5 million podcasts. How do we help the podcaster who is starting to be able to differentiate themselves in a much-crowded market even if most of those podcasts failed?

[00:16:34] It works for us. I suspect it works for other industries and other people as well. It used to be that we would ask people to subscribe. That was our ask on the show. We have quit doing that. Now, we ask people to leave a review, not a rating where they have to type in a few words even if it’s only three words like, “It is great.” What happens with myself and most of the people that we have interviewed around this is when they’re scrolling through their podcast app of choice and looking for new podcasts, they look for those reviews to help them figure out if they want to listen to it.

For us, one of the ways to stand out is to make sure you get as many reviews as you possibly can. The funny thing is they don’t have to be five-star reviews. They could be a bunch of 2 or 3-star reviews but if you have a bunch of those, people will stop because they figured there’s an activity and something that they need to check out. That would be my first tip to stand out.

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting
Future Of Podcasting: If you want to make money, the podcast niche is the way to go because now you have an audience of similar people with similar experiences and likes that buy similar things.

 

The other thing is we are super niched. A lot of people think that’s the wrong approach. I disagree and say that is the right approach. We have 2 industry leader shows and 2 technology shows inside of oil and gas. We have an oil and gas technology show. It’s focused on the IT side, bits, bytes, routers and switches.

We have a technology show in oil and gas that’s focused on the business leaders that use technology to fix business problems. There are two different audiences. Even though those audiences are smaller than if you had a more generic podcast around technology, they’re super valuable from sponsorship and a host point of view. My hosts are telling detailed stories to listeners. It’s exactly what the listeners have.

I firmly believe that a lot of podcasting’s success is the fact that you can learn while you’re doing something else, working out, commuting or washing dishes. If you have a small audience that appreciates learning from you and listening to your stories, you’re going to stand out in that niche. You may never meet Joe Rogan’s numbers but you may be the top podcast for Polish meat cooking in the nude or whatever your super niche thing is. That’s valuable when you can stand out in your niche.

[00:19:09] It’s interesting because I heard a story about a guy who does a podcast on 1957 Chevys. That’s it. It’s not enormous but he’s got a loyal audience. He makes a fortune in advertising dollars from the companies that want to sell to the guys that are 1957 Chevy enthusiasts.

[00:19:32] If you want to make money from your podcast, niching is the way to go because you have an audience of similar people with similar experiences and likes that buy similar things. Our health, safety and environmental podcast is a perfect example. If you were a manufacturer of hard hats, work gloves, flame-resistant clothing or any of that stuff, you would want to be in front of that audience because those are the people that use and buy it. We didn’t start that way. It was a total accident that we started niching our podcast. If you’re looking at it from a commercial point of view, the more niche you are, the easier is to sell sponsorship dollars.

[00:20:05] Another thing is that sponsorship dollars are not the only way to make money. People who are long-term audiences of this show know that I’ve never had a sponsorship dollar. I’ve never had a sponsor for this show or sold anything on this show. I use this show as a way to build, know, like and trust. People call me to do keynotes, consult for them and do work for their companies. That’s how I make my money off the show. There are lots of different ways to be a great podcast and revenue generation. A lot of my guests over the years have turned into clients, business partners or referral partners. There are different ways to be able to utilize a podcast for revenue generation. It doesn’t have to be about sponsorship or advertising dollars.

When you listen to audio with headphones, your brain thinks it's real. When you watch a video on a screen, your brain knows it's a screen and not real. Click To Tweet

[00:21:04] We experiment with different revenue generation all the time. I’ll be clear here. We don’t do advertising. I need a backup because now we are but up until this reason, we don’t do advertising. We just do sponsorship. There’s a difference. Our sponsors tend to want organic brand recognition. I’ll give you a perfect example. We will pick IBM, one of our sponsors. In my industry of oil and gas, a lot of people think IBM still builds laptops. They have not built a laptop in twenty years.

IBM is a technology think tank but people in my industry don’t know that. We don’t sell IBM stuff. All we do is talk about how IBM has helped Baker Hughes with its hybrid cloud strategy. The audience hears that and goes, “I didn’t know IBM does that.” They reach out to IBM and sales follow but we’re not measured on clicks, downloads or sales. It’s telling the story of IBM. That’s what sponsorship is for us. That’s what all of our sponsors are. It’s that model.

We have launched a livestream show as an experiment where we intentionally advertise. We have two 30-second spots on there that companies pay for to get exposure. They want a backlink. They can track that backlink to see how many clicks we generate for them. It’s too early to tell if it worked or not. It’s making enough money to pay for the show but it’s not profitable. Give me some time.

The other thing is as an experiment. We launched two podcasts behind Apple’s paywall. I was hoping I would have 100 people sign up to pay $2.99 a month to listen to that. I would consider that success. We have 3,000 people. That’s interesting as one of the shows behind the paywall is bonus content. When we finished recording our biggest podcast, Oil and Gas This Week, we leave the microphones on, rift and talk about what we learned, what we liked and what we did.

We throw that bonus content behind an Apple paywall and then have a separate show called The Balance Point where I’m bringing people on that don’t like the oil and gas industry. You only can access it behind the paywall. To your point, there are many different ways to monetize your podcast. One of the things I tell all beginning podcasters is, “This is a passion project of yours. This is something that you believe in with your heart and soul. You need to monetize it to at least cover your expenses because if not, real life gets in the way.”

“You get extra busy at work. A kid gets sick. You skip one episode. You skip a week and then a month and then you’re gone. If you can make a little money at it to pay for your overhead, an editor or somebody to mark it so all you do is the talent, it’s so much easier to keep doing it. You get so much better at it. You build such a bigger audience.” Monetization is not a bad thing but there must be 50 different ways to monetize a podcast.

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting
Future Of Podcasting: Looking at it from a commercial point of view, the more niche you are, the easier it is to sell sponsorship dollars.

 

[00:23:41] I was looking at a company. They said, “We have a podcast.” I went, “That’s great.” I go take a look at their podcast. Their first episode was in March 2019. Their sixth episode was in January ’22. That was also their last episode. They’re calling it a podcast. However, what they’ve got is six random conversations on a page on their website over three years. There’s no way to build, know, like and trust. There’s no way to get to know the company and why you should be in charge of them.

It’s all about consistency. It’s about showing up week after week because people get busy. I’ve got a lot of companies where the CEO wants to be the host of a podcast. I’m going, “Can you guarantee every Wednesday at 10:00 a new episode is going to go live and you’re not going to miss a week because you’re on a plane somewhere?” He goes, “No.” I said, “You should not be the voice of the podcast.”

You need to have people in the company, an external professional or whomever you want to have as part of the podcast who knows that their job is to be able to make sure that once a week, twice a month or whatever schedule you pick for your audience that consistently, every single time, a good-quality episode is going to go out the door. That’s what people need to think about podcasting. It’s not about one episode. It’s about the catalog. I love your thoughts on that.

[00:25:10] I’ve seen from experience. We deal with a lot of big companies. We typically end up at some point in the marketing room with the marketing team. What happens in my industry is when somebody suggests that they work with us and we launch a podcast for this big company, the marketing team inevitably 80% of the time when I leave or my team leaves says, “We can do this ourselves. We do it cheaper and better.”

I’ve seen this happen over and over again. I don’t know the exact number. Around 60% of those companies that try to do it themselves come back to us 1 year or 2 later and go, “Number one, it sounds like we’re trying to market ourselves. We don’t have this independent third party. Number two, the consistent thing sucks because we all have real day jobs.”

If you’re a company out there thinking about doing this yourself, my suggestion would be to hire an outside person to host the podcast that’s going to crack the whip to make sure the episodes get out there but then give that outside person access to your subject matter experts and senior leaders. That’s a much better way to have a podcast that will move the needle for your company than you trying to do it yourself.

For amateur podcasters, the technology has gotten so good and inexpensive. The world is your oyster. Click To Tweet

[00:26:13] Let’s talk about where we go because podcasting has changed. Everybody sat there and said, “Clubhouse is going to be the future of podcasting. LinkedIn Audio is going to be the future of podcasting.” The jury is still out on that one. Where do you see podcasting going? I still see podcasting as an audio format. If you want to have a video-productive podcast, that’s not a podcast. That’s video production. That is almost like a mini-TV show. That’s my viewpoint on it. I would love to hear where you see the world going. Where do you see the next years? What are the opportunities out there for people?

[00:26:58] That’s my pet peeve too. I’ve lost the battle although I tell people all the time that if you have a video, it’s not a podcast. By definition, a podcast is an audio file served by an audio server that is pushed out via an RSS feed. If it’s anything other than that, it’s not a podcast but everybody calls videos podcasts. There are a couple of things. You can consume a podcast while you’re doing something else. Do not try to consume videos while you’re driving, please. I see you all on the roads. You scare the crap out of me.

The native format of being able to do something else while you learn is the inherent strength of a podcast. Where do I see it going? I don’t see that changing. The problem with Clubhouse, Twitter Spaces and LinkedIn Audio is that it is short-form content for the masses. If you’ve ever sat in the Clubhouse or Twitter Spaces, anybody and everybody wants to step in. You have control over whom you allow to speak but you’re not following the storyline or having a detailed conversation with a guest about a business problem to help them solve it. They have their places but it’s much shorter-form content.

Think about the last Clubhouse or Twitter Spaces you listened to. I bet you can’t remember what it was about because the podcast is longer and more focused. It stays in your memory. It’s embedded in people’s heads. Most people listen to a podcast with earphones. There’s this psychological thing that goes on. When you listen to audio with headphones, your brain thinks it’s real. When you watch a video on a screen, your brain knows it’s a screen and it’s not real. That’s why you get that intimacy with the podcast.

Where do I think it’s going? The fat lady hasn’t even sung in the first inning. If you don’t follow baseball, I’m saying that we’re in the very beginning. There’s so much going on. All of the big content aggregators like Netflix, Amazon, HubSpot and Spotify are buying content creators, including podcasters because they want that unique content. We’re in the infancy of that. We have been approached by several of those companies. I’ve refused to do any work with them because it’s way too early. In a couple of years, that market is going to mature.

The other thing that I have my eye on is augmented reality. I don’t mean wacko glasses that you put on while you’re playing Xbox games. We’re getting to the point from a technology point of view where you can overlay video and audio in the real world. If anything is going to add to podcasting, it may be augmented reality. It’s way too early to tell yet but the thing about augmented reality is you also can consume that content while you’re doing something else. We have our eye on that. We’re watching that closely. We going to do some experimenting with that in 2023.

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of Podcasting
Future Of Podcasting: Being able to do something else while you learn is the heritage strength of the podcast.

 

For amateur podcasters, the technology has gotten so good and inexpensive. The world is your oyster. How about this, Ben? When I look at our stats, we are in every country in the world except one. An oil and gas podcaster owns almost the world as far as audiences. If I can do it, everybody can do it. The future is bright for podcasting. I don’t think it will ever go away. The commercial opportunities are only going to grow.

You look at Serial and some of the entertainment podcasts. It is crazy the amount of success they’re having with. That’s going to continue to go straight up. Even the dollars that podcasters are getting have gone up and even the ability to sell sponsorship. When we first started, my biggest pushback against selling sponsorships was, “What is a podcast?” Now, everybody knows what a podcast is. It makes it even easier to sell sponsorships. The future is bright for podcasters.

[00:30:24] We’re about to bring this thing in but I have a couple of questions I want to ask you before I let you go. The first one is this. What’s the one piece of advice you would give to somebody within a business situation wanting to start their podcast?

[00:30:40] It depends on why they want to start it. Let’s take a salesperson. I don’t care whom you work for and what you sell. Starting your podcast is a great way for you to get your message out there and show your domain expertise. A good salesperson knows their product or service so well even if it’s a commodity. Your buyers want to work with you because you help them keep from making mistakes.

If you’re a salesperson, think about every question you’ve ever gotten from a prospect. That’s an episode for a podcast. Let’s flip that around. Let’s say you’re the company trying to use podcasts for sales. Do not start your podcast. You have to have this independent third-party separation because if you try to start your podcast to market your company, your buyers immediately are going to think that you’re trying to market your podcast.

However, as a company, if you want to educate the audience on what you’re doing, that’s a different story. You can do that. Think of every white paper and big production video you spent money on as a company. Throw it out the window. You use a podcast to do that but if you’re going to do that, figure out how you’re going to make sure you’re consistent with getting those messages out.

Starting your podcast is a great way to get your message out there and show your domain expertise. Click To Tweet

Take that white paper, turn it into 3 or 4 parts and have different people including your clients come on and talk through that. That would be a fantastic educational podcast instead of a boring white paper. For individuals out there, you could use it to promote your career and show your domain expertise. For companies, if you’re using it for marketing, you need a third party to do it in some fashion and how it works best for you but you can’t do it yourself.

[00:32:10] Tell, don’t sell. I love that. It’s the best way of doing it. Mark, the best way to get people to get in touch with you is at OGGN.com. Is there a better way for people to get in touch with you?

[00:32:21] If you want to reach out to me directly, the quickest way usually is on Twitter, @Mark_LaCour. If you want to check out our network, it’s OGGN.com. We have fifteen separate oil, gas and energy podcasts. We’re launching four more. We have eight more in the works until the first quarter of 2023. We have crazy growth. LinkedIn is another good place to find me. I put a lot of content out there. It’s Mark LaCour.

[00:32:48] Here’s the last question I ask everybody as I let them out the door. As you leave a meeting, get in your car and drive away, what’s the one thing you want people to think about you when you’re not in the room?

[00:32:59] “He’s helpful.” It’s not about selling anything or, “This guy has an audience.” It’s, “This guy was helpful.” If I can leave this world that way when I’m stuck in that pine box and people are there talking and they go, “Mark was helpful,” that means I made a difference.

[00:33:14] This wouldn’t be a bad thing to have on my tombstone. Mark, this was a phenomenal interview. I love the information and your passion for the subject. Thanks for being an amazing guest.

[00:33:25] Thanks for inviting me. I had a good time.

 

LBL Bryce | Red Team Thinking

 

Important Links

 

About Mark LaCour

LBL Mark LaCour | Future Of PodcastingMark has lived and worked in the Oil and Gas industry for over 25 years. Later he started his own market research company and has a well-earned reputation as an industry “insider” and independent 3rd party researcher. This led to him becoming a part of the new media, where he runs the worlds largest Oil and Gas podcast network, with over 2.6 million listeners from 198 different countries. He is a sought after public speaker, author, sits on several oil & gas boards and has one of the top oil & gas presences on social media.

 

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Silver - one episode plan $4395.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Four 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Four 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable pecple to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social meda.
  • Six images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Five or Six tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • An edited transcript of the interview that enable you to ganer even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • One 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing that looks like this

GOLD - four episode plan $10998.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do t, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Three additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social mead and email campaigns regularly,
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 3060 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media
  • Twenty-four (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis
  • Twenty four (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Four (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Four 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this

PLATINUM- twelve episode plan $27750.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine.
  • Eleven additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Twelve (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Twelve 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this.

The SILVER option is designed for companies on a limited budget or who would like to try the power of the Communicate Your Why program before committing.

It provides you with a reasonable amount of shareable content and access to our network. However, for most companies, this may not provide a full year's worth of marketing materials. If you purchase a SILVER package and decide to upgrade within 30 days of the airing of your episode, we will credit 90% of the SILVER package towards either a GOLD or PLATINUM package.

Our expectation is that we will release your episode within 30 days of the recording date.

The GOLD option is a basic yearly marketing package.

Optimally, you would release an episode quarterly and use the content that accompanies it to update your marketing on a quarterly basis. It is literally four times the amount of marketing materials as the SILVER option and allows you to not only tell your story but create a case studies with clients or talk about specific ways you add value to your clientele in a non-sales way. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and a more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes quarterly.

The PLATINUM option is designed as a monthly marketing package

It gives you the content you desire to stay top of mind with your clients and prospects, talk about ongoing developments and tell a more robust story. Again, if you purchase a GOLD package and decide to upgrade to a PLATINUM one within 90 days of starting the original GOLD package, we will credit 90% of the original purchase price towards the price of the PLATINUM option. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes monthly.