Your Brand Marketing

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team Culture

 

A company is more than its mission and vision. It’s about the culture. And when we look at company profiles, more often than not, culture is highlighted. It’s now one of the top things to consider in finding the right company to work for. But how do you define culture? What makes it the right one for us? How does culture affect performance and attrition? Certified Speaking Professional, Gregg Gregory of Team Rock, talks about the who, what, and whys of company culture. He shares insights on how people play an essential role in creating and upholding an effective culture that can ultimately make or break a company. Don’t miss out on this episode and learn how you can align your team to not only take your company value statements to heart but to live up to them!

ONE TEAM ONE DREAM: INDISPENSABLE TEAMWORK SKILLS TO CREATE A COLLABORATIVE CULTURE: https://teamsrock.com/shop/

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LBL Bryce | Red Team Thinking

 

One Team One Dream: What Makes An Effective Team Culture With Gregg Gregory

[00:01:07] Welcome back, my wonderful audience. Thank you for coming back week after week, month after month, year after year. I love the fact that you guys come and join us. I love the fact that you share and that you email me at Ben@YourBrandMarketing.com. That you connect with me on LinkedIn and let me know what you love. Thank you for coming back.

We’ve had lots of people ask us about culture. Culture is an undefined thing. It’s one of those things that we take a look at. What culture means to one person means something completely different to somebody else, and we need to have a conversation about this. I brought in the expert. I brought in Gregg Gregory from Teams Rock. Gregg, welcome to the show. Let’s talk culture.

[00:01:53] You said undefined, and that is undefined but it’s defined. We got a culture. Every team has a culture now. They may not realize it or not, but it’s there, and they just haven’t necessarily identified it.

[00:02:08] I feel the same thing about brand. Every company has a brand, and brand and culture are very much hand in glove. They are definitely the yin to yang but most people sit there and go, “They can’t define their brand but everybody has got one.” It’s only a matter of sussing it out, realizing, codifying, communicating, and living it. That’s where we are going to go in this episode.

[00:02:32] We got to do it. It’s all about behavior. The culture, I define it very simply, is the behaviors that you accept. One of my clients one time defined the brand or his culture as this, “Just draw a line on a sheet of paper and then whatever you put above that line, on the top half of the page, those are the behaviors that you allow to happen. Under the line are the things you don’t allow to happen.”

If you are doing a meeting and somebody comes into the meeting five minutes late, nobody says anything about it because guess what? That’s above the line. It’s above the line, and you are allowing it to happen. That line is your culture. Now, if you don’t want that behavior to happen, you need to move it below the line then the entire team needs to decide that. It does come down to being that simple. Put it below the line. Everybody has the right to say it. In other words, even the most junior person can say to the CEO, “You were late for this meeting. That’s unacceptable behavior.”

[00:03:23] That’s how cultures evolve. Cultures evolve because cultural norms evolve. People sit there and say, “That was acceptable in 2019. That certainly an acceptable in 2022.” We get into this evolving culture into the fact that where we were is not necessarily where we are, and that may not be where we are going, and that’s okay.

[00:03:46] It’s got to be because if we looked back many years ago, the culture that was acceptable behavior is not acceptable behavior now.

[00:03:58] Let’s get in a little bit more about who you are first, and then I want to get back into it because you and I had an interesting conversation about Hidden Figures, which is apropos for this. Let’s stop for a second. Let’s rewind and find out a little bit more about Gregg because having some context of who you are, where you came from, and what brought you to the cultural arena is important for the conversation going forward.

[00:04:27] A lot of people laugh because I tell them I’m an only child, I worked by myself, and I teach teamwork. Everybody gets a good laugh out of all of that but we all have a culture. What’s our culture? It was one of those things that started coming back to me, and I started investigating it. I was researching it and finding out what works. What’s the culture? One of my favorite companies to look at was Marriott Hotels. Their culture has always been about a spirit to serve. It’s about serving people. That goes all the way back to how they got started in 1927 as an A&W root beer stands in July of 1927 when it was hot in Washington, DC. By November, it was cold. Nobody is buying root beer floats, so they had to figure something out.

Teamwork is the single greatest advantage any organization can have in today’s complex workplace. - Gregg Gregory Click To Tweet

They carried the spirit of serving to a restaurant, and Mrs. Marriott, at the time, knew how to cook Tex-Mex food. She was cooking all the food in a little restaurant they called Hot Shoppes, which expanded from there. They didn’t open their first hotel until 1957, 30 years later. By 1972, they only had 30 hotels. That’s when Bill took over but he kept the spiritual serve culture, and that is still there to this day. Even though the father has passed away, Bill Jr. has now stepped away from day-to-day operations, and they are now into their fourth CEO, Arne Sorenson, who has suddenly passed away but they are still having that same culture. That’s that is what I find fascinating in how it is and how people live it.

[00:05:50] I look at the Marriott and am a card-carrying member of Marriott. I have been in Marriotts around the world. I walk in. I’ve got a gold card or my platinum card. God knows where I am now.

[00:06:02] The Titanium Elite.

[00:06:03] I don’t think I’m quite there yet.

[00:06:06] We got to get you up to there. It’s a nice club to join.

[00:06:10] We are heading that way. When you walk in the door, and you have that feeling, the way that they are trained, the way that they bring their people into the organization, the way that they live their culture makes you feel like a guest, especially as a business guest. As a business guest, you want to sit there and say, “Whenever I go into a hotel, I know the beds are going to feel like this. I know that the rooms are going to be clean. They are going to have my name there. They are going to have the apples or the cookies sitting there waiting for me.” There are all sorts of different things that you sit there and say, “Fine. I can relax. I’ve had a long, hard flight. I’ve had a long hard day. I’m not home but this is about as close as I’m going to get to it.”

[00:06:52] Sometimes, it feels more like home because the Marriott Hotels are so much more than we are our own beds.

[00:06:57] There was a time when I was in the air 200 days a year. That absolutely was the truth. When you look at it and sit there, you say, “That doesn’t come easily. That doesn’t come without a lot of work. It doesn’t come without a lot of purposes and without a lot of direction and leadership.” Let’s talk about that.

 

[00:07:16] Let’s look at it this way. Give me an example, and some people don’t believe this, “Nobody is that way. They can’t do that all the time.” I was in Chicago delivering a training program many years ago, and there was a new Marriott Hotel downstairs in the building. In downtown cities, they build things up, over hotels and around hotels but downstairs, a JW Marriott had opened up about three weeks earlier. I was not staying there. I could not get a room in the hotel. I was at another Marriott down the street. I’m talking about culture in this training program. I was talking about their core value basics cards. I know we are going to get into the basics cards a little bit but they had their basics cards for the Marriott.

[00:07:59] Explain what the basics card is. Let’s start there, so people understand what it is.

[00:08:03] It can be anything, and every company has its own. I’ve worked with law firms that have theirs. I’ve worked with everything else and what they are is 5, 10, 15 or even as many as 20 of the core basics. These are the things that they live by, breathe by and do. Everything they say, do, work, believe, and use. At the time, Marriott was focusing on twenty basics. They used twenty basics and evolved. It’s like the culture. They are evolving. They would use twenty of them because there would be twenty work days in a month for everybody.

They would go over one basic per day. That’s how they would operate. What’s the core value basic of the day? They had to know, live and breathe that for that day. The next day, it would be a different basic. They go over that, live and breathe that every single day. They would go over it before the shift. They would find out somebody who lived the basics the day before. They would identify somebody from the day before. They would have a huddle meeting every day before a shift. That’s the power in that. I’m talking about this, and there’s a woman in this program. I’ve never forgotten her. She looked at me, “That’s bull. Nobody believes that crap.”

I went on a limb here. I had no idea how this was going to turn out. I said, “I will tell you what. I need two volunteers. When we break for lunch, let’s go downstairs. Let’s walk in and grab a few employees and ask them if they know what their basic is for the day.” This woman raised her hands and said, “I will do it,” as if she wanted to prove me wrong. I’m like, “Please, let’s make this work.” The two people from the class and myself went downstairs. I said, “One of the things. I don’t want to interrupt anybody from doing their regular job. We’ve got to find somebody who’s not busy at the moment.”

We are walking in, and it’s about 12:15 or 12:30. They’ve got the guests checking out. They get the new guests. Some of them are already starting to come in. There are business meetings. There are all kinds of activities going on. We walked over to the side, and I found two people. I said, “Excuse me. I’m doing a training program upstairs. I’m curious. Did you all have your core value basics for the day?” The gentleman looked at me. He says, “Absolutely, but I’m in management. Why don’t you ask her?” I asked the other employee, and it was taken to her. She says, “Our basic today is whatever it was.” She was like, “Thank you.”

They turned and said, “She’s with the manager. She had to know what it was.” I walked over to the bartender. He was prepping and getting ready for lunch. I said, “Do you know what the basic is for now?” “Absolutely. Today’s basic is,” and he rattled off on the top of his head. There it was, and the same basic too. We went around the front lobby. There were three bellmen. All three bellmen knew what they were, pulled the basic’s card out, and showed it to us.

[00:10:37] That’s powerful if you think about that, all the way from senior leadership down to the bellman and everywhere in between.

Culture can simply be defined as the behaviors you accept. Click To Tweet

[00:10:46] We got back upstairs, and that was a funny part, “They actually believe this crap. It works.”

[00:10:54] She was now bought in. She was now going to proselytize this, and she’s going to tell that story to everybody that she knows.

[00:11:02] It’s so powerful but comes all the way down. You said it’s from the top down. I was speaking to a general manager of a Marriott Hotel in California one day. We got to talking about the well-known white glove tests that Bill Marriott used to do. Folks, when I say a white glove test, he literally would put on and would bring several with him. He would put on the white gloves on his hand and wipe down places. This GM tells me there’s one time where he was in the kitchen and asked for a ladder. He got up on the ladder, climbed up on top of the refrigerator, stuck his hand down behind the refrigerator, and used a white glove test. He says, “This is what I expect you to see,” and he’s not afraid to climb on top of a refrigerator.

[00:11:43] That is how cultures are built because it’s not just words, phrases, not because I have to. It’s because my leader tells me I have to do it. It’s a belief from everybody within the organization.

[00:12:01] It goes back to Southwest Airlines Founder Herb Kelleher. Their philosophy was, “Our best customer is not our customer. Our best customers are our employees.” If we take care of our employees, our employees will take care of our customers, so it reverberates throughout the entire organization. The Southwest Airlines culture is one of having fun. Get your job done, be safe, and have fun. That’s what it’s about.

You look at the culture of In-N-Out Burger. For those of you on the East Coast of the United States, you have no idea what I’m talking about. Talk to your friends on the West Coast. They will tell you all about In-N-Out Burger. You can’t get a chicken sandwich. You can’t get a salad there. They have burgers and burgers and animal-style fries but they’ve got fries.

Those are the things that they do. That is the strength of what they’ve got, and that’s what makes it work. The energy level, the funness. There’s a restaurant in Barbados called Chefette. They modeled after McDonald’s and In-N-Out both. They’ve got that energy level. They’ve got people that have worked there as cashiers for over 25 years. Why can’t people do that in those types of jobs? It’s because they believe in the culture.

[00:13:37] That culture is not just words on a wall. You and I talked about this before going on the air, and I still want to get back to Hidden Figures, and I’m not going to let you forget about that.

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team Culture
Team Culture: You have to be responsive to the people you work with and, most importantly, be responsive to yourself. Take care of yourself because without that, it doesn’t work.

 

[00:13:46] I got off on that thing.

[00:13:48] That’s okay because I want to get back to Hidden Figures because it’s important. When we are dealing with culture, I have been part of it. I’m sure you have been part of it. Hundred other people have gone away on these wonderful retreats and created mission/vision value statements as part of the culture. “All of these things are above the line. These are the things. Customer’s job one. Employees are number one.”

They take and post it in the 200-point font on the wall somewhere. It’s never lived. There are no examples of it. Decisions are made that are contrary to that. “This is what’s important for my team to do but it’s certainly not important for me to do.” How can the culture be built that’s a positive culture, that’s a fun culture, and that’s a culture that people believe in if all it is, are words on the page?

[00:14:39] It’s because they don’t buy it. A classic example was early in my speaking career. I got a company to give me their vision and mission statements. I put it up on the PowerPoint screen in the room and said, “Where does this come from?” People are looking up at it and go, “That’s a quote from somebody.” It was in their owners and the other operations book but they never went over it.

What Marriott does and what a lot of the best companies do is they live it by repeating it over and over. “The next time a guest is in a Marriott Hotel, I want them to take note. If they are walking down a hallway in the guestrooms and there’s a housekeeper there, maybe vacuuming the floor or maybe coming in and out of a room. Take note, at 15 feet, that housekeeper will stop what he or she is doing and step back. At 10 feet, they will make eye contact. At 5 feet, they will say hello. After you pass on the other side at 5 feet, they will begin to start to do their work.” It’s called the 15, 10, and 5 Rule.

[00:15:34] That’s powerful because it’s part of the culture but what you are doing there is you are respecting the guest. What we said in Marriott in whatever it was when they started off making root beer floats, it was all about the ability to serve. They are going, “How do we take care of our guests? How do we make people feel like our guests? How do we make people feel special, valued, listened to understand, and able to enable them to have the most successful day they can? We can do that because that’s our purpose. That’s our mission. That’s our culture.

[00:16:11] That’s what people want to do. They want to find what they are good at. Let’s get back to your Katherine Johnson. If we look at the Hidden Figures story, which is an amazing story, I encourage people to dig deeper back behind that. Dig down below and research that because the women in Hidden Figures are amazing. A) They are women. They didn’t have a lot of rights. B) They were African Americans and even fewer at that time.

It was all in what started to come together about the way that it worked, and I believe, and I’m going from memory now. Executive Order 8802, signed by President Franklin Roosevelt, said, “The Federal Government in the United States could not discriminate in hiring people.” If they were qualified, they got the job but the problem was that men had the jobs until World War II broke out, and then the women started coming in. Katherine Johnson and these other women are brilliant mathematicians.

Find something you love to do, be passionate about it, and you'll never work another day in your life. Click To Tweet

Here’s a funny story. I think it’s Katherine Johnson’s great, great granddaughter, who is a Mathematician major in college. She was on the Today Show. It’s amazing to see how the power and all of that start to work. How their internal culture first spread out, and John Glenn was known to say that he would not trust a computer until Katherine Johnson checked his numbers.

[00:17:41] We are talking IBM. He wouldn’t trust IBM until Katherine Johnson checked the numbers. What they had, and those women as a group and Katherine Johnson, in particular, was a culture of excellence. NASA had a culture of excellence, especially the space program in the ’50s and ’60s.

[00:17:54] It even goes back to the ’40s and the precursor to NASA and how they work. They had to be in separate buildings and go to other buildings to give the information because they were African American women.

[00:18:08] By having that culture of excellence, it enabled them to have pride in what they were doing and realize that there were lives at stake. That it wasn’t about them. It was about the overall mission. It was about working as a team and understanding that when one wins, everybody wins.

[00:18:27] John Kennedy said, “A rising tide raises all ships,” but the mission is one of the keywords in my system for building a great team. You’ve got to have a passion for your mission. If you don’t have a passion for what you do and are just going through the motions, why are you doing it? You go get a job but find something you love to do. I can’t tell you the first time I ever heard the phrase but you said the phrase and it resonated with me years ago. “Find something you love to do. Be passionate about it, and you will never work another day in your life.”

Mac McAnally wrote a song called It’s My Job made famous by Jimmy Buffett. I saw Mac perform the song. He said, “All of us are out there working, and it’s difficult. We are working on a job that we hate just so we can get a better job that we hate less, and eventually, you get to do the job that you love to do.” What is something you love to do?

[00:19:20] We all have stuff we love to do. For me, it’s helping people communicate more effectively. For you, it’s culture. For me, it’s communication. It brings down brand and storytelling for me but it’s getting people to understand that, “Passion is a wonderful thing.” I look at that as a utopia. Very few people are completely passionate about what they do unless they own the company. However, we need to have a sense of satisfaction.

We all need to realize that the work that we do has meaning. That we are helping the company be better. That whatever we do on a daily, weekly, monthly or yearly basis matters and that it enables it to become better. That’s how cultures are built because people are sitting there going, “I may not love what I do. Today may suck. It may be a horrible day but I’ve got a team around me that is going to make it suck less. I’ve got people around me that will elevate me. That will enable me to be better tomorrow and to have that sense of direction, that goal or that vision about where we are going.” That’s where culture is a huge driver to be able to solidify those teams and get people not only the teams a sense of direction but the individuals within the organization as well.

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team Culture
One Team, One Dream: Indispensable Teamwork Skills to Create a Collaborative Culture

[00:20:43] You brought up a couple of key things there. You talked about giving it direction. It starts with four keywords, and mission being one of those keywords. People have to have a passion for what they do, and this day’s Gen Zs and Millennials are all about having a passion for doing something. That it means something and not just get a check, that’s key. You’ve got a mission. You got to take pride and take care of ownership.

Everything that you do, you have to own. There are so many people who do a great job but don’t take credit for it. You need to take credit for it without being boisterous but you also have to own the times when you screw up. You have to be responsive to the people that you work with. You have to be responsible to your customers and your bosses.

Most importantly, you got to be responsive to yourself. Take care of yourself because without that, it doesn’t work. Also, you got to trust. Those are the four keywords that come into play for an individual. Now, we build off of the core value basics. I’m using the core value basics. First, come out to the individual traits that you need to do like trust, ownership, responsiveness, and mission.

Once those are in place, then the team has to work together. When the team starts holding each other accountable, they are synchronized in what they are trying to do. They are sharing the knowledge, everybody is engaged, and they are getting people engaged. Some people are automatically engaged. Some people are automatically disengaged but what we need to do is make sure we are all engaging each other. You got eight words. When those eight words with the core basics are in place, that’s when you’ve got a thriving culture.

[00:22:15] I call it accountability and expectations, and they have to mesh. It’s not just your bosses’ expectations of you into accountability but your expectations of them and the accountability that they have to you and the individual accountability that you have, and the expectations you have of your teammates and different divisions. The more we can codify what our expectations are, “I need you to have this done by this date because we are trying to do this.” It’s building in the why.

[00:22:45] You hit a point. You hit the why. Simon Sinek talks about it, starting with why. “I need you to have this finished because this is what we are trying to do.” You’ve given them the why behind it. When people know the why, they are going to figure out the how. I always tell people, “Always start with the why. We are trying to get this accomplished by this date so that the bosses can have this. This is what I need you to do.”

I came out of the mortgage banking business. You can always tell people, “I need you to bring your two years of W-2s and your bank statements.” I was like, “That’s so much stuff.” I turned it around and said, “To get your loan into underwriting, more expeditious loan approval for you, and get you the best rate possible, I need you to bring the following information, then it’s not so much.”

[00:23:26] They are listening to a lot more intently because they see, “By me doing this extra effort, by me paying attention to this, I’m going to get what I need.”

When people know the why, they're going to figure out the how. Click To Tweet

[00:23:37] Leaders do the same thing with their colleagues. Leaders do the same things with their employees. Colleagues, we need to do it. When we take those eight words and build that culture, then we are putting ourselves on a course that’s going to make it work. You are going to build an on-purpose team, and that’s something powerful. A friend of mine used to get yelled at by his mother as a child. He would say, “Mom, I promise I didn’t do that on purpose.”

We started wanting to live our lives on purpose. That’s where on-purpose teams come from. Make sure you are doing it on purpose. Know what your vision, mission, and values are. Repeat them. Share them and get to know them. I ran into a gentleman. He and I went to high school together. We didn’t know each other really in high school. It was a large school. He was a year behind me but we had the same principal. He said something about Mr. Frank Tracy. I said, “Do you remember the ten little words?” He said, “Of course I do.”

Now, I graduated high school in ’75. He graduated in 1976. You do the math on the number of years, folks. I said, “Do you remember the ten little words to success?” It’s 2 letters each, 1 syllable. “If it is to be, it is up to me.” Frank Tracy instilled that, and that was the culture in the high school under his regime for over fifteen years as a Principal of a high school in a Metropolitan area. I have said that speech in programs and watched people in the audience who happened to have gone to that school at that time. There are thousands of people, and they know the ten little words. Mike remembered the words. That’s what a culture is. It’s about living it. Even in high school, we had a culture.

[00:25:14] What happens when we don’t live it? When we are dealing with the toxic cultures and the Great Resignation.

[00:25:20] I call it the Great Reshuffle.

[00:25:23] I wrote a great article a couple of months back. It was about rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic, so I agree with you.

[00:25:32] I have lived that in my life for the last months, packing up to move my house. I was rearranging chairs on the Titanic was the expression we use.

[00:25:42] I don’t want to dwell on this because we are running short on time but I want to sit here and say, “What is the biggest thing that you believe that creates these toxic cultures that lead to people being frustrated, disengaged, leaving their companies or worse, staying and being completely ineffective?

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team Culture
Team Culture: When the team starts holding each other accountable, they’re synchronized in what they’re trying to do. They’re sharing the knowledge. Everybody’s engaged, and they’re getting people engaged.

 

[00:26:03] Let’s go back to Jim Collins’ book that he wrote years ago called Good to Great. Chapter 3 of Good to Great was called First Who, Then What. Get the right people on the bus, get them in the right seats, and that’s what most people remember. There was another part of that. Get the wrong ones off the bus. When the wrong people are not removed from the bus and being wrong does not mean that they are necessarily negative.

It may mean that they are good people, they are just on the wrong bus, and that’s okay. Maybe they are in the wrong seat. I had to take somebody in the mortgage business and move him to a whole different position because he was in the wrong seat on that right bus. He had the right attitude but was in the wrong seat doing the wrong job. Once I moved him over, he started to thrive.

[00:26:37] What if the wrong person on the right bus is the CEO?

[00:26:41] If that’s the case, then the board of directors has to come to the realization about that or they’ve got to change the entire direction of everybody, and that’s not easy to do. If you think about it, the olden days back in the ’70s and ’80s because it’s a little different now with nuclear power on aircraft carriers but it used to take 12 miles to stop an aircraft carrier when it’s cruising 30 knots.

It would take them an hour to make a full 360-degree turn. Larger companies have a harder time making those big shifts. If that culture is there, that’s what’s causing the resignations. People leave organizations because the culture is not the right culture. They are not a good fit. They don’t see themselves working well. They are not getting the opportunities. Money is not the reason people leave organizations. Not the number one reason, anyway.

[00:27:30] Before we close this out, I got a couple of questions for you. What’s the one thing that I missed? What’s the one thing that you are sitting there going, “I think that we need to talk about this because of culture, and it’s so important that everybody needs to know about it.”

[00:27:44] I want everybody to research as many great companies as they can. Look at those companies. Look at those organizations and those great teams, whether it’s sports teams or not. Look at them and find out what’s there. What are they doing? John Wooden is a great coach for UCLA. What did they do to win so many championships? What we’ve got to do is we’ve got to step back and look at what’s working for us and what’s not.

We get into our lives every day and just go. I’ve started taking yoga classes. I’m old taking yoga but when I come out of that yoga class, I’m refreshed for the day, and it gets me into the right frame of mind. That’s the one thing I think we need to make sure we talk about learning and being able to find what’s working.

Have an excellent exceptional day because having a good day is just being average. Click To Tweet

[00:28:29] What’s the best way for people to get in touch with you?

[00:28:31] The easiest way is LinkedIn. Everything I do is around my company name called, TeamsRock.com. LinkedIn is @TeamsRock, Twitter is @TeamsRock, and Facebook is @TeamsRock. It’s Gregg Gregory. I look forward. I would love to hear from some of your readers. Some ideas and the things that they’ve done. I love hearing success stories, too.

I love hearing great stories about organizations that have done culture, core values, and basics cards and have got great cultures because of that. I share those stories. I was sharing a lot with the Marriott stuff because of other things I’ve heard from them and experienced with them. I’ve had the privilege to meet Mr. Marriott on several occasions, and he blogged about me in his blog podcast.

[00:29:24] I love the fact that we’ve had this time together. I can’t wait for your book to come out. I know you are still early on in writing it but the research that you tell me that you are doing on different organizations and their cultures. What people could learn from them is going to be a phenomenal read. When the book comes out, we may have to have you back on to talk about that.

[00:29:46] I’m excited about that because the book is about on-purpose teams, and it’s the strategies behind some of the most successful teams on Earth. We are taking teams like Katherine Johnson’s team. We are taking the Miracle on the Ice hockey team. We are taking some of these great teams, not all sports, believe me, and finding out the secrets for what they are doing. So far, what we have found is my nine words are right there.

[00:30:30] Here’s the last question and I’m going to let you out the door. When you leave a meeting or you get off the stage, you finish your training, get in your car, and drive home, what’s the one thing you want people to think about you when you are not in the room?

[00:30:42] “His energy was off the freaking chart.”

[00:30:45] How can I even respond to that? I know your energy is there, and people love the passion you have.

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team Culture
Team Culture: People leave organizations because the culture is not the right culture, and they’re not a good fit.

 

[00:30:52] We are doing this over the camera and are not in the same room. I’m only about 80% of my normal energy.

[00:30:59] You are already blown me away. Gregg, you have been an absolutely incredible guest. You have been lovely to listen to and insightful. Keep talking about culture because it’s important.

[00:31:12] The other thing I want people to remember is I am passionate about what I do. I am an only child. I work by myself and am passionate about teamwork and culture.

[00:31:22] Thank you for being who you are.

[00:31:23] I hope everybody has an excellent exceptional day because having a good day is just being average.

 

LBL Bryce | Red Team Thinking

 

Important Links

 

About Gregg Gregory

LBL Gregg Gregory | Team CultureWith more than 2,000 keynotes, breakout sessions and training workshops under his belt, Gregg Gregory is the team-building mastermind everyone needs today. A Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) with more than 25 years working at all levels within in corporate America; Gregg’s experience goes beyond expectations. His expertise and articles have appeared in 100s of business and trade publications across the country.

His podcast, The Teamwork Advantage has been downloaded in over 55 countries around the world, and his client list of over 400 companies, non-profit associations, and government agencies include New York Life Insurance, The University at Buffalo Neurosurgery, and Lockheed Martin, as well as over 30 Federal, local and state government agencies, including every branch of the United States military.

Gregg’s quote that “Teamwork is the single greatest advantage any organization can have in today’s complex workplace.”, resonates with every level of an organization.

Through the pandemic, Gregg revaluated the process and the elements that make a successful team, or as he calls it an “ON-Purpose Team”. He will share the foundation of that here today

 

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Silver - one episode plan $4395.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Four 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Four 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable pecple to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social meda.
  • Six images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Five or Six tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • An edited transcript of the interview that enable you to ganer even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • One 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing that looks like this

GOLD - four episode plan $10998.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do t, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine
  • Three additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social mead and email campaigns regularly,
  • Sixteen (4 per interview) 3060 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media
  • Twenty-four (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis
  • Twenty four (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Four (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Four 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this

PLATINUM- twelve episode plan $27750.00

  • One 60-minute recorded interview to understand who you are, what you do, why you do it, who you do it for and why they should care. This interview is designed to show your true value and enable you to shine.
  • Eleven additional 60-minutes recorded interviews that can be testimonials with clients, case studies, best practices or top questions of your clients answered. The goal is to provide value to your audience that creates trust with them and gives them reason to buy from you.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 2-3-minute videos that come from that interview that help you tell specific parts of your story that you can put on your website and used through social media and email campaigns regularly.
  • Forty-eight (4 per interview) 30-60 second audiograms designed to enable people to have a quick understanding of your value and why they should search you out to find out more through their use on your website and social media.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) images that you can use through your social media on an on-going basis.
  • Seventy-two (6 per interview) tweets that can be sent out regularly.
  • Twelve (one per episode) edited transcripts of the interviews that enable you to garner even more market materials and have approximately 6500 words on your website that provides SEO benefits.
  • Twelve 25-35-minute podcast episode on the Find Your Pro Show with a marketing page that looks like this.

The SILVER option is designed for companies on a limited budget or who would like to try the power of the Communicate Your Why program before committing.

It provides you with a reasonable amount of shareable content and access to our network. However, for most companies, this may not provide a full year's worth of marketing materials. If you purchase a SILVER package and decide to upgrade within 30 days of the airing of your episode, we will credit 90% of the SILVER package towards either a GOLD or PLATINUM package.

Our expectation is that we will release your episode within 30 days of the recording date.

The GOLD option is a basic yearly marketing package.

Optimally, you would release an episode quarterly and use the content that accompanies it to update your marketing on a quarterly basis. It is literally four times the amount of marketing materials as the SILVER option and allows you to not only tell your story but create a case studies with clients or talk about specific ways you add value to your clientele in a non-sales way. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and a more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes quarterly.

The PLATINUM option is designed as a monthly marketing package

It gives you the content you desire to stay top of mind with your clients and prospects, talk about ongoing developments and tell a more robust story. Again, if you purchase a GOLD package and decide to upgrade to a PLATINUM one within 90 days of starting the original GOLD package, we will credit 90% of the original purchase price towards the price of the PLATINUM option. We would suggest that you have us interview other employees, suppliers, strategic partners and/or clients with additional episodes in order to add additional value and tell a richer and more robust version of your brand story.

Our expectation is that we will release your episodes monthly.